Tag Archives: Monasterevan

Grand Canal Coaches

In order to accommodate Ladies and Gentlemen who travel in the Grand Canal Passage Boats, there are established two elegant Coaches to convey passengers to and from their respective houses in Dublin to and from the Grand Canal Harbour, near St James’s-street.

The Coaches will set out from Goulding’s-lane, Anne-street, (South) at four and seven o’clock every morning, on and after Saturday the 16th of April next, and will call at the houses of such Ladies and Gentlemen as have previously taken and paid for their places at Mr Harrison’s Office, No 32, Dawson-street, which will be open from nine o’clock in the morning till eight at night for that purpose. Fare forfeited if the Coach is detained more than five minutes at any one house.

The Coaches will attend every day at the arrival of the Naas and Monasterevan Passage-boats, to convey the Passengers to their respective houses in Dublin.

Those who take places in the Coach will be secure of a passage in the Boats: — no large parcel can be admitted into the coach, it is therefore recommended to such as may have parcels to send them to the Grand Canal Harbour the evening before the boat sails.

RATES

From any part of the town to the Grand Canal Harbour.

1s 7½d for one passenger, from one house.
2s 8½d for two                              ditto
3s 3d for three                               ditto, and
1s 1d for any other passenger from said house.

Three Men Servants may be accommodated with places behind the coach, for which Half Fair will be required, proportioned as above.

A Guard attends the early coaches throughout the year.

The Passengers are requested to communicate to the Director of the Grand Canal the misconduct of any person or persons entrusted with the management of this department.

Dublin Evening Post 29 March 1796

 

Grand Canal bridge problems [updated]

Read about them here.

That’s not the Irish Grand Canal: it’s the one in Venice, the Monasterevan of the south.

There is a list of Santiago Calatrava’s bridges here, but information about his Irish bridges is lacking. Perhaps someone could send info about the James Joyce bridge and the Samuel Beckett bridge to The Full Calatrava.

Another iconic Calatrava achievement is described here [h/t Don Quijones].

Nothing in this post is intended to be insulting or degrading.

PS here’s a piece about another bridge being built in Foreign Parts, using a floating crane that even Bindon Blood Stoney might have been proud of.

Bell, book and candle …

… shall not drive me back, but something has driven boats from the Bell Harbour in Monasterevan, which I can’t recall seeing so empty: just one cruiser and one WI workboat.

Monasterevan May 2013 03_resize

Cruiser at the Bell Harbour

Monasterevan May 2013 01_resize

WI workboat at the Bell Harbour

Actually, I’m not sure whether it is a WI workboat: I can’t see any logos or other ID on it.

The dangers of canal bridges …

… to Her Majesty’s mails.

Kildare County Council endangers citizens

The Barrow at Monasterevan (or -in)

Wouldn’t it be better if the Council ordered weak currents instead?

 

More workboats

Here is a very long page showing working boats that are not operated by Waterways Ireland. They include hotel boats, restaurant boats, trip boats, rescue boats, police boats and sand barges.

Monasterevan revisited

I’ve added two items to my page about Monasterevan. One is about the ban on Sunday traffic and the other is about how boats got across the Barrow before the aqueduct was built. I’m afraid the items are in the middle of the text ….

Back in the USSR

I’ve added some photos of Moscow to my page South of Moscow, north of Geneva about the Grand Canal Company’s collieries.

South of Moscow, north of Geneva

Here’s a new page about some canals that were never built: several proposals for canals to the Grand Canal Company’s collieries in Co Laois.

Monasterevan, the Venice of the west

This is a considerably expanded and updated version of an article I wrote years ago, with lots of photos. There are traces of three lost waterways to be seen in Monasterevan (my favoured spelling) and lots of other interesting waterways artefacts as well. There is even an operational puzzle: in the days when boats locked down from the canal to the Barrow, and locked back up on the far side, how were they propelled (and controlled) when crossing the river?