Dredgers and dredging

Some dredging is done from boats but a lot of it, nowadays, is done with long-reach excavators, whether from a pontoon, from the bank or from the bed of the river. Some of the rigs pictured may have been on contract to Waterways Ireland while doing the work shown here. This contractors’ rig was employed to dredge the Abbey River in Limerick.

Dredger on the Abbey River

Dredger on the Abbey River

Here is a similar but, I think, larger rig at work on the tidal Shannon below the sealock in Limerick.

Dredging the channel below the sealock in Limerick

Dredging the channel below the sealock in Limerick

Here is a similar but smaller dredger on the Shannon–Erne Waterway.

Dredger on the Shannon–Erne Waterway

Dredger on the Shannon–Erne Waterway

The next one shows a small dredger in the section of the Park Canal in Limerick. It must, I think, have been launched by a crane. I don’t know whether it was a Waterways Ireland or a contractor’s boat.

Dredging in March 2007. Note the steep sides of the canal

Dredging in March 2007. Note the steep sides of the canal

Here is an L + M Keating excavator dredging the lock in Limerick. There is more about Keating operations on several pages linked to this one.

Dredging the sea lock chamber 8

Dredging the sea lock chamber

Dredging the sea lock chamber 3

Long reach

L+M Keating also dredged outside the canal harbour, where the pontoon in the first photo on this page was positioned. The large machine can float: its tracks are mounted outside what are in effect large pontoons. I think it can then flood them to hold itself in position. The large machine put the dredged material on the bank, whence a second excavator (just visible on the right) could load it into trucks.

The floating excavator

The floating excavator

The two excavators

The two excavators

Keatings also have a wonderful machine called a Versi-Dredge, which I haven’t seen, but there are photos of it here and a PDF here. This is a private-sector dredger, available for excavating harbours and so on. It’s in the canal at Killaloe, outside Waterways Ireland’s Swiss Army Knife.

63M at Killaloe

63M at Killaloe

Shannon Foynes Port Company uses this vessel, the Shannon 1, built in 2007. It probably does all sorts of other things, like WI’s Swiss Army Knife; indeed it is described as a multi-purpose vessel [PDF], what used to be called a DEFT, and is officially a Damen Multi-Cat.

Limerick Port dredger Shannon I 4_resize

Shannon 1 1

Limerick Port dredger Shannon I 5_resize

Shannon 1 2

Limerick Port dredger Shannon I 7_resize

Shannon 1 3

Limerick Port dredger Shannon I 11_resize

Shannon 1 4

 

Shannon 1 off Shannon Airport

Shannon 1 off Shannon Airport

The older SFPC dredger, the Curraghour II, was built in 1959 at the Liffey Dockyard, as a successor to the 1912 Curraghour, which was a sister ship to the Port Lairge. Curraghour II (141′ X 32′ X 13′, deadweight capacity 440 tons) is a “combined grab and suction hopper dredger”, re-engined in 1998 with an 800hp Caterpillar diesel. [Details from Pat Sweeney Liffey Ships & Shipbuilding Mercier Press, Cork 2010.)

Limerick Port old dredger Curraghgour II 3_resize

Curraghour II

Here is a pontoon-mounted excavator at Kilmore Quay Club on Lough Erne.

Pontoon with excavator at Watermill restaurant on Erne_resize

More to come as I find them.

[non-wi wb 15]

2 responses to “Dredgers and dredging

  1. frank o brien plassey cotman

    could the limerick erinna canal be dredged like the park canal,whereby cots breacauns and canoes could use same .one foot in depth would do.

  2. There might be that much in most of it anyway. You would have to do something about the locks, though, which would be difficult; I suppose you could provide landing places above and below. The other two obstacles to be considered are the rights or expectations of the lockkeepers’ families and the cost of creating a safe system. bjg

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s