Tag Archives: Royal Canal

Royal Canal greenway

Big it up, says Sarah Carey in the Indo.

Just Arrived

Royal Canal 2nd Lock (OSI 6″ ~1840)

Inland Navigation from Connaught,

A Large quantity of POTATOES, selling as follows, at the Canal Bridge, Lower Dorset-street, engaged good and Dry, at 7d per Stone. One Hundred Weight sent home to any part of the City, on the North Side of the River Liffey, for 4s 8d, carriage Free.

Encouragement to wholesale Dealers, by Grant, at the Coal and Turf Stores, Second Lock, Royal Canal.

Saunders’s News-Letter 30 June 1830

Garryowen and the Royal Canal

The shortage of water for the Royal Canal has been covered a few times on these pages with pieces about its feeders in general, the Lough Owel feeder in particular and the proposed replacement supply from Lough Ennell.  Last I heard, the Lough Ennell proposal had become a matter for Irish Water rather than for the local authority, which sent the whole thing back to the drawing-board but if, Gentle Reader, you have more recent information, do please leave a Comment below.

A recent post about the inadequacy of back-pumping from the Inny led to a discussion in the Comments, from which it became plain that the Lough Owel feeder was well below normal levels and that the water supply to Mullingar, never mind that to the canal, was seriously inadequate. I was prompted to suggest that one of these might be the best type of boat for the Royal.

But I see from the blatts that the seventh cavalry, in the shape of Irish Water (whistling Garryowen, of course), intends to take water from Lough Ree to supply Athlone, Mullingar and Moate.

Perhaps there will be some to spare for the Royal Canal.

A boat for the Royal

Someone asked me the other day what, given the unreliable water supply, would be the ideal boat for use on the Royal Canal.

I replied that it should be one with four-wheel drive. Maybe one of these.

The Broadstone dry docks

See here for a slightly more detailed view from 1847. The third dry dock, at the junction with the main line, is here.

Mallett’s Insistent Pontoon is shown here marked “floating bridge”; the map also shows the drawbridge that featured in the attempted murder of Henry Garnett.

Royal Canal dry dock

Aidan Herdman has left a comment on my page about the Broadstone Line of the Grand Canal and has included in it a link to a photograph of Phibsborough cubs/scouts standing at the Royal Canal dry dock. I can’t recall ever seeing such a photo before. It’s an impressive structure and I’m grateful to Aidan for the link.

Pumping the Royal

Waterways Ireland is still pumping water from the River Inny into the Royal Canal at the Whitworth Aqueduct near Abbeyshrule, but the level is still well down. I imagine that that makes it impossible, at least for larger boats, to travel the canal at present.

The location

The inflow from the pump

The level on the aqueduct

Assistance to canals in Ireland

The assistance given to canals belonging to companies in Ireland in the last and commencement of the present century was chiefly in the form of loans of public money or by grants from special or general taxes; but we have been unable to obtain from the records of inland navigation in Ireland a complete account of the public loans which were made for such purpose.

Report of the Commissioners appointed to inspect the accounts and examine the works of Railways in Ireland, made to the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty’s Treasury HMSO, London 1868

How true those words are even today.

I would be grateful if anyone could tell me the full cost of the restoration of the Royal Canal and the Ballinamore & Ballyconnell Canal, now the Shannon–Erne Waterway.

 

Costs on the Royal and the Grand 1843 and 1844

The second half-yearly meeting of the Grand Canal Company in 1844 seems to have been an extended affair. It was adjourned to allow the directors to amend their report on “the state of the company’s works” and, when it reassembled on Saturday 23 November, there was an unusually large attendance and a fractious debate, with several criticisms of the accounts and their “ambiguity and unintelligible nature”. The inconclusive meeting was eventually adjourned until 14 December, to allow proprietors [shareholders] to examine the accounts.

Amongst the critics of the directors was Mr H Bruce, who was unhappy with several aspects of the management of the company, one of them the extravagance of the directors. He said

He had taken the trouble of comparing the Grand Canal with the Royal Canal Company for two consecutive years, and he would give the meeting the result of that comparison.

Here are the elements of that comparison in tabular format.

Those with a keen interest in the Royal Canal Company will no doubt have been surprised to find its management being complimented for anything, but the comparison is interesting even if, as Sir John Kingston James pointed out, the Royal Canal Company had fewer [passenger-carrying] boats “and consequently they had to pay less for horse power”: it would have been fairer to compare the costs per mile.

On repairs, Mr Bruce said that

Every one knew that the Royal Canal was a much more perishable canal than the Grand Canal, for instead of being excavated, a great part of it was built. No canal was more liable to the danger of an outbreak on the country, and of being bored through, than the Royal Canal, consequently it required more money to keep it in repair than the Grand Canal […]. Yet, what was the amount charged for repairing the Royal Canal in 1844, though in that year a serious breach took place in it? — why, only £1869.

Note that salaries cost considerably more than did the boat crews and that horse contracts, for hauling the boats, were about four times the cost of masters and crew on the Grand and aboout six times that cost on the Royal.

Dublin Evening Post 26 November 1844

Jamestown and the Longford

Jamestown [Co Leitrim] Heritage Festival starts on Friday 25 May and runs until Sunday 3 June 2018. The programme is here.

Apart from the presence of numerous barges and other vessels, the festival will feature these events of historical interest:

  • Saturday 26 May: talk by Alf Monaghan on Doon to Diesel, a review of the importance of Drumsna and Jamestown in Transport History
  • Sunday 27 May: talk on the sinking of the Royal Canal passage-boat Longford [in which fifteen people died] in 1845
  • Monday 28 May: bus trip to Arigna Mining Experience
  • Tuesday 29 May: talk by Alf Monaghan on Monastic Ireland — a gift from the Nile and display by Carrick-on-Shannon Historical Society
  • Wednesday 30 May: walking tour of Jamestown led by historian Mary Butler
  • Saturday 2 June: talk by Donal Boland on The Shannon’s hidden locations and gems and, in the afternoon, “traditional method demonstrations”.