Tag Archives: Royal Canal

Broadstone addition

Thanks to Pat Conneely for this photo of the Broadstone station and the Royal Canal. I’ve added it to my page on the Broadstone Line of the Royal Canal.

The Broadstone station before the canal harbour was filled in (photo courtesy Pat Conneely)

The photo must have been taken before 1877, when the harbour was filled in.

 

 

 

 

Blanchardstown Mills

County Dublin: a bleach and flour mill

To be sold or let for such term as may be agreed upon, a Plot of Ground, on the north side of the Royal Canal, adjoining the 12th Lock, containing 1 acre 1 rood [illegible] on which a considerable sum of Money has been expended in erecting a Bleach and Flour Mill, together with the waste and superfluous water at the 12th Lock on the Royal Canal, which gives an inexhaustible supply of water in the dryest season to the Mill, which, in every respect, is well circumstanced for a Manufactory or Flour Mill.

These Concerns lie immediately adjoining the Canal Bridge, on the new road leading to Blanchers-town [sic] at the 12th Lock, about three miles from the City of Dublin.

There is a person on the premises who will show them, and proposals in writing will be received by Henry Cosgrave, Esq, No 64, Eccles street.

Dublin Mercantile Advertiser, and Weekly Price Current 31 July 1826

Header photo 20191202

Looking towards Clondra Lock.

Royal Canal greenway

Big it up, says Sarah Carey in the Indo.

Just Arrived

Royal Canal 2nd Lock (OSI 6″ ~1840)

Inland Navigation from Connaught,

A Large quantity of POTATOES, selling as follows, at the Canal Bridge, Lower Dorset-street, engaged good and Dry, at 7d per Stone. One Hundred Weight sent home to any part of the City, on the North Side of the River Liffey, for 4s 8d, carriage Free.

Encouragement to wholesale Dealers, by Grant, at the Coal and Turf Stores, Second Lock, Royal Canal.

Saunders’s News-Letter 30 June 1830

Garryowen and the Royal Canal

The shortage of water for the Royal Canal has been covered a few times on these pages with pieces about its feeders in general, the Lough Owel feeder in particular and the proposed replacement supply from Lough Ennell.  Last I heard, the Lough Ennell proposal had become a matter for Irish Water rather than for the local authority, which sent the whole thing back to the drawing-board but if, Gentle Reader, you have more recent information, do please leave a Comment below.

A recent post about the inadequacy of back-pumping from the Inny led to a discussion in the Comments, from which it became plain that the Lough Owel feeder was well below normal levels and that the water supply to Mullingar, never mind that to the canal, was seriously inadequate. I was prompted to suggest that one of these might be the best type of boat for the Royal.

But I see from the blatts that the seventh cavalry, in the shape of Irish Water (whistling Garryowen, of course), intends to take water from Lough Ree to supply Athlone, Mullingar and Moate.

Perhaps there will be some to spare for the Royal Canal.

A boat for the Royal

Someone asked me the other day what, given the unreliable water supply, would be the ideal boat for use on the Royal Canal.

I replied that it should be one with four-wheel drive. Maybe one of these.

The Broadstone dry docks

See here for a slightly more detailed view from 1847. The third dry dock, at the junction with the main line, is here.

Mallett’s Insistent Pontoon is shown here marked “floating bridge”; the map also shows the drawbridge that featured in the attempted murder of Henry Garnett.

Royal Canal dry dock

Aidan Herdman has left a comment on my page about the Broadstone Line of the Grand Canal and has included in it a link to a photograph of Phibsborough cubs/scouts standing at the Royal Canal dry dock. I can’t recall ever seeing such a photo before. It’s an impressive structure and I’m grateful to Aidan for the link.

Pumping the Royal

Waterways Ireland is still pumping water from the River Inny into the Royal Canal at the Whitworth Aqueduct near Abbeyshrule, but the level is still well down. I imagine that that makes it impossible, at least for larger boats, to travel the canal at present.

The location

The inflow from the pump

The level on the aqueduct