Tag Archives: cot

Fishermen

On Sunday evening a conflict took place between the fishermen on the river above Thomond-bridge, Limerick, which at one time threatened very serious consequences. It appears that since the interruption to their fishing at the Island point some of the long net fishermen procured short or snap nets, and commenced fishing lower down the river. The short net men did not like this intrusion, and it would appear that no amicable feeling prevailed between the parties. After nine o’clock in the evening the short net men put out their nets, when the others attacked them; the boats fouled each other, the men commenced to fight, and some stones were thrown over the parapet of the bridge which did injury to the cots of the short net men. The presence of Constable Frawley and some of the police tended somewhat to repress their disposition to violence, but it is apprehended that further and more serious collisions may take place between the parties.

Saunders’s News-Letter 15 June 1855

Lough Derg Regatta 1834 (b)

Yesterday I posted a notice from the Limerick Chronicle of 20 August 1834, outlining the schedule of events for the regatta to be held on Lough Derg later that month.

In a comment, Vincent Delany M.A. (Hist.) said

Lough Derg YC was founded c. 1836 but regattas to approx the same format existed on Lough Derg before the formalising of the yacht club.

My thesis ‘yachting and yachtsmen on the Shannon 1830s to 1930s’ discussed the issues extensively.

I have not seen the thesis, alas, but I thought I’d see what else the invaluable British Newspaper Archive had on the subject. The first result was that there was no mention, in any newspaper, of a Lough Derg regatta before 1834. I have not attempted to search for all possible terms involving sailing boats, races, yachts and so on; I think I can say that the 1834 event was the first on Lough Derg to be designated a regatta.

There had been similar events on the estuary before then: the Limerick Chronicle of 30 July 1834 reported the early events of the Royal Western Yacht Club’s regatta at Kilrush. Just below that it said

The Committee of the Lough Derg Regatta met at Killaloe on Friday, when a Commodore, Stewards, Secretary, and Treasurer, were appointed.

The 1834 regatta was covered by The Pilot on 29 August 1834. At the time, the term “upper Shannon” distinguished the freshwater from the tidewater: “lower Shannon” meant the estuary.

LOUGH DERGH REGATTA

Lough Dergh Regatta, Upper Shannon, commenced on Tuesday under most favourable auspices. The beautiful scenery of that romantic region will now be seen to great advantage, and many visiters [sic] have left to enjoy the treat. On Wednesday the boat races were to take place at Killaloe, and the Messrs Paterson, from Kilrush, 70 miles distant, on the Lower Shannon, have entered to contest the prize in that department. The band of the 91st Regiment, from Limerick, attended the regatta.

There were not less than ten thousand people assembled on the shores at Williamstown and Drumineer [sic] to witness the scene on Tuesday, and the Lake was literally covered with row boats, filled with ladies and gentlemen. There were five yachts started for the challenge cup, from Drumineer to Holy Island and back. The Corsair, Mr White, came in first; Ida, Mr Bailey, second; and Thomas, Lieut Tully RN, third.

There were only three minutes between those three boats — the others were not placed. Wednesday’s race was to be run by the same boats, for the Salver; and on Thursday the rowing matches take place at Killaloe. The Lady Lansdown [sic] steamer attended, and was crowded to excess, so much so that they were obliged to refuse taking more company on board.

A somewhat confused reporter there, but never mind. Interesting to note that Tom Bailey was navigating Ida around the Shannon way back then: he must be older than he looks.

The Northern Whig of 4 September 1834 added a little colour:

This Regatta commenced on Tuesday sen, as we announced, and the numerous gentry who attended from the adjoining counties, fully realized the anticipations we had formed of its attractions. The delightful scenery of the Upper Lakes, enlivened by the gay yachts, crowded with beauty and fashion, floating on their bosoms, had a most pleasing effect.

So many visiters [sic] arrived at Killaloe, to enjoy the diverting sport, that it became almost impossible to procure even ordinary entertainment. […]

In the following year, the Roscommon and Leitrim Gazette (18 July 1835) reported that

The Lough Derg Yacht Club have adopted the rules and regulations of the Royal Western Yacht Club, and the Regatta commences at Killaloe, the 23d inst; Dromineer, the 24th, and at Williamstown, the 25th instant.

Whose idea was it?

My interest in this topic is in the involvement of Lieut John Tully RN. He visited Limerick in 1829 to make arrangements for the arrival of the first City of Dublin Steam Packet Company [CoDSPCo] steamer to operate on the Shannon, the Mona. It was replaced later that year by the Kingstown, which Tully captained for some time. In 1831 he was the company’s Limerick agent (John Grantham was its acting manager) and from then on, for the rest of his working life, he seems to have been an agent or otherwise working for or with the Company; he spent much time as Agent at Killaloe and later at Athlone. The yacht he sailed in 1834, the Thomas, may have belonged to the company’s founder, Charles Wye Williams, who in 1829 had a 10-ton schooner of that name at Liverpool.

Tully was Secretary and Treasurer of the first Lough Derg Regatta. It involved the provision of special packet boat services on the Limerick Navigation (controlled by a company strongly associated with the CoDSPCo. The regatta spent one day at Killaloe, where the company owned a hotel, and another at Williamstown, its private harbour, where it likewise owned a hotel. It also used either one or two of the company’s Lough Derg steamers.

Most importantly, though, it attracted visitors to Lough Derg, and thus supported the CoDSPCo’s marketing efforts. They included sponsorship of publications, special attention to visiting writers and large-scale advertising.

None of this is evidence that the CoDSPCo invented the Lough Derg Regatta, but I would not be surprised to find that it was at least an early and enthusiastic supporter of the concept.

For an account of a later Lough Derg Regatta, that of 1849, see here.

 

Lough Derg Regatta 1834 (a)

THIS REGATTA has been got up in a spirited manner by the Gentlemen of the Counties of Tipperary, Galway, and Clare, and will commence on TUESDAY, the 26th instant, between Drumineer and Williamstown, and will continue for three days successively. The gig and cot races will be held at Killaloe, on the last day. The Lady Clanricarde steam vessel will attend on the lake each day, and two morning packets will start from Limerick at six o’clock AM and return in the evening for the accommodation of the Public.

First Day’s Sailing, August 26

A Challenge Cup, value 30 guineas, to be won two years in succession. Three minutes to a ton allowed to smaller vessels open to all classes. Entrance one guinea.

Same Day

Cot race for three sovereigns for boats pulling two oars. — No race unless 4 start. Entrance 2s 6d.

Second Day, August 27

Time race sailing match. Entrance 1 guinea. Four to start, or no race — for Salver, value 10 guineas.

Same Day

A cot race for three sovereigns for cots pulling two oars. Entrance 2s 6d.

Third Day at Killaloe, August 28

Sailing match for sweepstakes, for the beaten boats. — One guinea entrance.

Same Day

A gig race, rowed and steered by Gentlemen, pulling 4 or 6 oars, for a silver snuff box, with a purse of 5 sovereigns, to be added by the Stewards. Entrance 2s 6d per oar. — Three boats to start or no race.

Same Day

A gig race, pulling 4 or 6 oars, for 6 sovereigns. Entrance 2s 6d per oar. Three to start or no race.

Same Day

A cot race, pulled by women, for £3. Three or no race.

Same Day

Flat cots for 3 sovereigns. First cot 2 sovereigns. Second cot 1 sovereign. Four to start or no race.

JOHN TULLY Lt RN Sec and Treasurer

NB Members &c on entering their yachts, must send their names, class, and tonnage, to the Secretary, four days previous to the days of sailing, and pay the regulated entrance at the same time.

JOHN TULLY, Secretary
Killaloe, August 20

Limerick Chronicle 20 August 1834

Update 8 January 2018

For more on the early Lough Derg regattas, see this piece. And here is an earlier piece about the Lough Derg Regatta of 1849.

Down the Nore from Castletown

Seventeenth-century transport on the Nore from Castletown to Ross and Waterford.

Delegated authority in the ESB

Just over a year ago, in June 2015, I wrote — at some length — about the right to navigate the Shannon through Castleconnell, Co Limerick. A member of the staff of the ESB fisheries department told me

The legislation empowering ESB to regulate activity on the Shannon is contained in the Shannon Fisheries Act 1935 – Section 9.1 (D).

That accorded with my own untutored understanding: according to Section 9 (1) (d) the Board is empowered to

(d) terminate, restrict, or otherwise interfere with, either permanently or temporarily and either compulsorily or by agreement, any easement, way-leave, water-right, fishing right, or other right over or in respect of any land or water[.]

However, I responded to the ESB pointing out that the existence of a power does not prove that the power has been exercised, much less that it has been exercised validly. I asked for information on (inter alia)

 

[…] what strategic decisions the Board has made on this subject, or what decision-making powers it has conferred on its fisheries staff […]

whether the Board has actually decided to “terminate, restrict, or otherwise interfere with, either permanently or temporarily and either compulsorily or by agreement, any easement, way- leave, water-right, fishing right, or other right over or in respect of any land or water”

if it has so decided, what the details of the decision are: details both of its making and of its application [.]

 

The Act gave the ESB a power, but the power has to be exercised properly and there must be a record of the making of the decision. I have had no reply to my queries, and my working hypothesis is therefore that the ESB has not validly terminated, restricted or interfered with the right to navigate the Shannon at Castleconnell. If I receive evidence to the contrary, I will of course change my view.

One part of the problem is that the Act gives the power to the Board and, in my view, employees of the Board cannot of themselves decide to exercise that power unless the Board has validly delegated the power to them. The fisheries department cannot close the navigation unless the Board explicitly gave them the power to do so.

A case at the Court of Appeal, reported in the Irish Times today [11 July 2016: the article may disappear behind a paywall at some stage], seems to support that view [although I am not a lawyer: please consult your own legal advisers]. The relevant paragraph is

The board was entitled to delegate the power to issue wayleave notices to its chief executive but was not entitled to “sub-delegate” to the chief executive power to authorise such other persons as he deemed appropriate to issue wayleave notices, Mr Justice Brian Cregan held. Any such persons had to be directly authorised by the board.

I suggest that the same may apply to fisheries and navigation. If the navigation at Castleconnell was validly terminated, restricted or interfered with, either the Board took that decision itself or it explicitly delegated the power to do so to the fisheries department (or someone else). In either case, there should be a Board minute on the matter and it should be possible for the fisheries department to cite that minute.

 

Castle-Connell Regatta

To take place on 1st and 2nd Oct, 1850

First days race

£        s        d

1st For all Four Oared Gigs                                                5        0        0
Entrance                                                                                0       10        0
Second boat to save entrance money

2nd For all First Class Cots                                                3        0        0
Entrance                                                                                0        5        0
Second Boat                                                                          0      15        0

3rd For all Fishing Cots to be rowed down stream and polled back with 2 Polls
First Boat                                                                              2       10        0
Second do                                                                             0       15        0
Entrance Each                                                                     0         2        6

4th For all Cots to be paddled down River with 2 Paddles and polled back with 2 Polls
First Boat                                                                              1       10        0
Second Boat                                                                         0         7        6

Second Day’s Race

First — For all Four Oared Gigs                                       4        0        0
Entrance                                                                                0        2        6
Second Boat to save Entrance Money

Second — For all Fishing Cots to be rowed with
two oars and a paddle                                                        2        0        0
Second Cot                                                                           0       10        0
Entrance                                                                               0         2        6

Third Race — For all Fishing Cots to be rowed
down the river with two oars and paddled
and polled back with two poles                                       1        10        0
Second Boat                                                                        0        10        0
Entrance                                                                              0          2        6

Fourth Race — For all Fishing Cots with
one paddle                                                                           1          0        0
Second Boat                                                                        0          5        0
Six to start or no race

NB No Race for any of the above Plates, unless 3 Boats start.

The decision of the Stewards to be final in all cases, and by whom the distance on the river will be laid out.

Boats for the First Race to start at Ten o’Clock precisely, and to be entered at Mr Wilson’s before Ten o’Clock each day.

An Ordinary at Wilson’s Hotel each day.

There will be a Ball at the Old Assembly Rooms, of which further notice will be given on Saturday.

Stewards

Sir Richard De Burgho, Bart
Colonel Vandeleur
Captain Wyndham 1st Royals
S Vansittart 1st Royals
A Vincent Esq
A W Heard Esq

Limerick and Clare Examiner 25 September 1850

From the British Newspaper Archive run by Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited, in partnership with the British Library.

 

Crime at Castleconnell

Charles Connors, of Castleconnell, cot builder, has been committed to Killaloe bridewell, for violating the person of a servant girl on Monday morning, at the Doonass side. He crossed the river in a boat, upon the pretence of ferrying her over, and then committed the offence.

Tipperary Vindicator 9 December 1859

From the British Newspaper Archive run by Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited, in partnership with the British Library.

Drowning at Doonass

Melancholy and distressing accident

By a Letter received at our Office, from Doonas, County Limerick, we regret to announce a melancholy accident having happened on Sunday the 9th inst in that neighbourhood. Mrs Massey, the wife of the Hon William Massy accompanied by her butler and two boatmen were attempting to cross the Shannon to Sir Hugh Masseys, where Mrs Massey was to dine. The evening was dark, accompanied by a dense fog, the boatmen lost their way, the boat was carried down by the current, and precipitated over the Leap, and melancholy to relate the entire party in the boat were drowned. During the entire of yesterday, the boatmen at Castleconnell were dragging for the bodies, but without success.

So dense was the fog that on the road between Kilmastulla, and Sallymount, the guard of the Coach was obliged to walk for upwards of 3 miles of the road, at the heads of the leading horses, and the coach agent was obliged to send a man on horseback with a lantern in his hand before the coach as far as Newcastle.

Dublin Mercantile Advertiser, and Weekly Price Current 17 January 1831

From the British Newspaper Archive run by Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited, in partnership with the British Library.

Limerick water levels 14 December 2015

The Abbey River

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Abbey Bridge

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Baal’s Bridge

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Mathew Bridge

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Current heading for Mathew Bridge

The Shannon in Limerick

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The weir

Plassey

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Lots of pumps running and equipment trundling about the place

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Trouble at t’mill

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T’millstream

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Cots on the bank

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The Black Bridge getting another hammering

Annacotty

I have been told that the Mulkear River rose very rapidly on Saturday night and that, at one time, it was feared that the (older) bridge would be swept away. I gather that folk working in other areas were called to Annacotty to deal with the emergency.

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The old bridge at Annacotty (downstream face)

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A tree in the water above the bridge

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There’s a weir in there somewhere

The Mill Bar in Annacotty was closed today after being flooded.

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The Mill Bar

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This, from a small garden beside the bridge, suggests that the Mulkear may have carried and deposited a lot of silt

The Park Canal

I gather that the Mulkear’s waters, added to those of the Shannon itself, raised the level of the Park Canal (the bottom section of the Limerick Navigation). A problem with opening the lock gates, to release the water, meant that a few houses in Corbally were flooded. A Sinn Féin councillor, whose party colleague has been responsible [with her southern counterpart] for slashing Waterways Ireland’s budget in recent years, is quoted as saying

I am in no doubt it was primarily caused by the ineptitude of Waterways Ireland.

Alas, the news story does not tell us the source of the councillor’s certainty.

The article also says that

[…] the force of this water meant it was not possible to open the lock gates by hand.

That is, I think, misleading: neither set of gates has gate beams, so they are not opened by hand.

park canal mist 03_resize

The upper gates in 2004, shortly after installation. Note the absence of gate beams. Note also the two sluices or paddles on each gate

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Control pedestal and gear

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The upper gates open today

I see no sign of the paddles or sluices. Perhaps the level is so high that they’re underwater. I must try to check next time I’m at the canal harbour.

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The upper gates in the floods of 2009

In the floods of 2009 the upper gates were held slightly open and all four sluices were discharging water. That would have lowered the level in the canal; it would also, I think, have made it easier to open the gates fully.

I am guessing, but I imagine that on Saturday night some sort of hydraulic machine was brought in this way …

Park Canal 20151214 21_resize

Two bollards have been moved from the gateway and stacked beside it

… and used to push or pull open the near-side upper gate. There seems to be some slight damage to the stone and iron work.

Park Canal 20151214 10_resize

Slight damage

One other possibility that struck me is that silt from the Mulkear might have built up behind the gates, making them difficult to open, but I have no evidence on the matter.

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The lower gates

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From the outside looking in

 

Barrow cot

The Kildare Nationalist tells us that folk in Athy intend to build replicas of a cot formerly owned by Cassidy’s of Monasterevin.

They say that

The whiskey and beer was transported to Dublin on canal boats and the Barrow Cot Boat would have been used to keep the river and canal clear for the bigger boats.

I don’t understand that. First, the bigger boats wouldn’t have needed to enter the river en route from the distillery to Dublin. Second, keeping the canal clear was the job of the Grand Canal Company, not of carriers or traders on the canal. I would be grateful for more information about this.

Cassidy’s actually operated until around 1921, early twentieth rather than early nineteenth century. Perhaps the Edgar Holmes who owns the cot is related to the Samual Edgar Holmes of the engineering firm said to have taken over the premises in 1934.