Tag Archives: Castleconnell

Races at Castleconnell

There was a considerable multitude of persons at Castle-Connell, yesterday, to enjoy the spectacle of boat-racing. Vehicles of all descriptions were in requisition, and the pedestrians of both sexes were numerous. The weather was delightful, and the enchanting scenery of this far-famed watering place appeared to the very best advantage. The band of the County Limerick Regiment, which attended in full uniform, gave a new zest to the festivities of the occasion.

The contest on the river was between Castleconnell and O’Brien’s-bridge for the premiums advertised last week, and the Castleconnell men were victorious.

We understand the Strand men have challenged Castle-Connell to pull from O’Brien’s-bridge to Castle-Connell for £7, any day next week.

Dublin Observer 8 September 1832

Delegated authority in the ESB

Just over a year ago, in June 2015, I wrote — at some length — about the right to navigate the Shannon through Castleconnell, Co Limerick. A member of the staff of the ESB fisheries department told me

The legislation empowering ESB to regulate activity on the Shannon is contained in the Shannon Fisheries Act 1935 – Section 9.1 (D).

That accorded with my own untutored understanding: according to Section 9 (1) (d) the Board is empowered to

(d) terminate, restrict, or otherwise interfere with, either permanently or temporarily and either compulsorily or by agreement, any easement, way-leave, water-right, fishing right, or other right over or in respect of any land or water[.]

However, I responded to the ESB pointing out that the existence of a power does not prove that the power has been exercised, much less that it has been exercised validly. I asked for information on (inter alia)

 

[…] what strategic decisions the Board has made on this subject, or what decision-making powers it has conferred on its fisheries staff […]

whether the Board has actually decided to “terminate, restrict, or otherwise interfere with, either permanently or temporarily and either compulsorily or by agreement, any easement, way- leave, water-right, fishing right, or other right over or in respect of any land or water”

if it has so decided, what the details of the decision are: details both of its making and of its application [.]

 

The Act gave the ESB a power, but the power has to be exercised properly and there must be a record of the making of the decision. I have had no reply to my queries, and my working hypothesis is therefore that the ESB has not validly terminated, restricted or interfered with the right to navigate the Shannon at Castleconnell. If I receive evidence to the contrary, I will of course change my view.

One part of the problem is that the Act gives the power to the Board and, in my view, employees of the Board cannot of themselves decide to exercise that power unless the Board has validly delegated the power to them. The fisheries department cannot close the navigation unless the Board explicitly gave them the power to do so.

A case at the Court of Appeal, reported in the Irish Times today [11 July 2016: the article may disappear behind a paywall at some stage], seems to support that view [although I am not a lawyer: please consult your own legal advisers]. The relevant paragraph is

The board was entitled to delegate the power to issue wayleave notices to its chief executive but was not entitled to “sub-delegate” to the chief executive power to authorise such other persons as he deemed appropriate to issue wayleave notices, Mr Justice Brian Cregan held. Any such persons had to be directly authorised by the board.

I suggest that the same may apply to fisheries and navigation. If the navigation at Castleconnell was validly terminated, restricted or interfered with, either the Board took that decision itself or it explicitly delegated the power to do so to the fisheries department (or someone else). In either case, there should be a Board minute on the matter and it should be possible for the fisheries department to cite that minute.

 

Castle-Connell Regatta

To take place on 1st and 2nd Oct, 1850

First days race

£        s        d

1st For all Four Oared Gigs                                                5        0        0
Entrance                                                                                0       10        0
Second boat to save entrance money

2nd For all First Class Cots                                                3        0        0
Entrance                                                                                0        5        0
Second Boat                                                                          0      15        0

3rd For all Fishing Cots to be rowed down stream and polled back with 2 Polls
First Boat                                                                              2       10        0
Second do                                                                             0       15        0
Entrance Each                                                                     0         2        6

4th For all Cots to be paddled down River with 2 Paddles and polled back with 2 Polls
First Boat                                                                              1       10        0
Second Boat                                                                         0         7        6

Second Day’s Race

First — For all Four Oared Gigs                                       4        0        0
Entrance                                                                                0        2        6
Second Boat to save Entrance Money

Second — For all Fishing Cots to be rowed with
two oars and a paddle                                                        2        0        0
Second Cot                                                                           0       10        0
Entrance                                                                               0         2        6

Third Race — For all Fishing Cots to be rowed
down the river with two oars and paddled
and polled back with two poles                                       1        10        0
Second Boat                                                                        0        10        0
Entrance                                                                              0          2        6

Fourth Race — For all Fishing Cots with
one paddle                                                                           1          0        0
Second Boat                                                                        0          5        0
Six to start or no race

NB No Race for any of the above Plates, unless 3 Boats start.

The decision of the Stewards to be final in all cases, and by whom the distance on the river will be laid out.

Boats for the First Race to start at Ten o’Clock precisely, and to be entered at Mr Wilson’s before Ten o’Clock each day.

An Ordinary at Wilson’s Hotel each day.

There will be a Ball at the Old Assembly Rooms, of which further notice will be given on Saturday.

Stewards

Sir Richard De Burgho, Bart
Colonel Vandeleur
Captain Wyndham 1st Royals
S Vansittart 1st Royals
A Vincent Esq
A W Heard Esq

Limerick and Clare Examiner 25 September 1850

From the British Newspaper Archive run by Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited, in partnership with the British Library.

 

The mystery of Mr Worrall

Castleconnell and Worldsend, Co Limerick (OSI 6" ~1840)

Castleconnell and Worldsend, Co Limerick (OSI 6″ ~1840)

The authors of a book called Village by Shannon, about Castleconnell, Co Limerick, say that the area of Worldsend, at the northern end of Castleconnell, derives its name from Worrall’s Inn, an establishment operated by a Mr Worrall in the early eighteenth century.

That may be so, but the book’s accounts of river-borne traffic — to a quay at the inn — do not seem to accord with what is known about the history of the Shannon navigation, and in particular of the Limerick Navigation between the city and Killaloe. Here are some of the problems.

My OSI logo and permit number for website

Crime at Castleconnell

Charles Connors, of Castleconnell, cot builder, has been committed to Killaloe bridewell, for violating the person of a servant girl on Monday morning, at the Doonass side. He crossed the river in a boat, upon the pretence of ferrying her over, and then committed the offence.

Tipperary Vindicator 9 December 1859

From the British Newspaper Archive run by Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited, in partnership with the British Library.

Drowning at Doonass

Melancholy and distressing accident

By a Letter received at our Office, from Doonas, County Limerick, we regret to announce a melancholy accident having happened on Sunday the 9th inst in that neighbourhood. Mrs Massey, the wife of the Hon William Massy accompanied by her butler and two boatmen were attempting to cross the Shannon to Sir Hugh Masseys, where Mrs Massey was to dine. The evening was dark, accompanied by a dense fog, the boatmen lost their way, the boat was carried down by the current, and precipitated over the Leap, and melancholy to relate the entire party in the boat were drowned. During the entire of yesterday, the boatmen at Castleconnell were dragging for the bodies, but without success.

So dense was the fog that on the road between Kilmastulla, and Sallymount, the guard of the Coach was obliged to walk for upwards of 3 miles of the road, at the heads of the leading horses, and the coach agent was obliged to send a man on horseback with a lantern in his hand before the coach as far as Newcastle.

Dublin Mercantile Advertiser, and Weekly Price Current 17 January 1831

From the British Newspaper Archive run by Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited, in partnership with the British Library.

Castle-Connell

The celebrated Chalybeate Spa of Castle-Connell will be open to the visitors this season gratis, by order of Sir Richard de Bourgho, Bart, the youthful proprietor of that beautiful resort.

Clare Journal, and Ennis Advertiser
14 May 1840

From the British Newspaper Archive run by Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited, in partnership with the British Library.

What’s a cumec, Daddy?

I don’t know, but here’s a picture of 415 of them flowing through Castleconnell. [Update 13 December: that may be only 405 cumec.]

Castleconnell 20151212 10_resize

415 cumecs on 12 December 2015

Actually, a cumec is one cubic metre of water per second, which is roughly one ton per second, which is a lot of water. And 415 cumec is the amount that, according to the blatts, the ESB is currently letting down the original course of the Shannon from Parteen Villa Weir; the minimum flow in that channel, as seen in summer, is 10 cumec.

Castleconnell 12 December 2015

Castleconnell 20151212 02_resize

Younger trees getting their feet wet

Castleconnell 20151212 11_resize

Who’d have guessed?

Castleconnell 20151212 14_resize

Below the bridge

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Above the bridge

Castleconnell 20151212 34_resize

Stormont

Castleconnell 20151212 37_resize

Pump

Castleconnell 20151212 40_resize

Sandbags

Castleconnell 20151212 42_resize

Sandbag Central

Castleconnell 20151212 43_resize

Sandbags filled here for distribution

Castleconnell 20151212 46_resize

Army engineers

Castleconnell 20151212 50_resize

More equipment arriving

Clonlara 11 December 2015

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Ardnacrusha headrace, said to take 400 cumec

PEC Errina Bridge 20151211 04_resize

Errina bridge on the Plassey-Errina Canal

PEC Errina Bridge 20151211 01_resize

The stop planks seem to be quite effective …

PEC Clonlara upstream 20151211 01_resize

… as there is little water getting down the canal to Clonlara bridge

Park Canal 9 December 2015

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Depth gauge at Park Lock

Park Canal 20151209 03_resize

Lock chamber

Park Canal 20151209 04_resize

Full canal upstream

 

Why the Shannon floods

From the search terms used, it seems that many people are visiting this site with questions about Parteen Villa Weir, water levels, Shannon floods and so on. They are not this site’s primary focus, but some non-technical information might be of interest.

The best place to start is with a map of the Shannon International River Basin District. As the Shannon RBD site says,

The Shannon International River Basin District is the largest in Ireland at more than 18,000 km2 in area. It covers the natural drainage basin of the Shannon river itself, stretching from the source of the River Shannon in the Cuilcagh mountains in Counties Cavan and Fermanagh to the tip of the Dingle peninsula in north Kerry. It also includes coastal parts of Kerry and Clare which drain to the sea. It flows through 18 local authority areas and is also an international RBD as a small portion of County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland drains underground to the Shannon Pot.

The district is about one fifth of the area of the island, one quarter the area of the state. Rain that falls on that area of land ends up in the Shannon (or in a few small rivers in Clare and Kerry that flow to the sea). Some goes to the Shannon estuary or its tributaries; most flows into the non-tidal Shannon, which means the river upstream of Limerick.

The nature of the Shannon

Ireland has been described as saucer-like, with a high rim and a low flat centre. It’s not entirely true, but there certainly is a very large central plain, and the Shannon flows down through the middle of that. And, because the land it flows through is flat, the river falls very little.

In 113 miles from Leitrim to Killaloe, the Shannon falls just over 30 feet; the navigation channel needs only five locks. [By way of contrast, the Thames has 45 locks over 135 miles; the Trent has 12 locks over 42 miles.] So extra rainwater allows the Shannon to spread out, covering a much wider area, and it takes time for that water to drain away downstream. But many of the rivers that flow into the Shannon have been subjected to drainage schemes, so they can get rid of their flood waters quickly … into the Shannon.

Why don’t they open [or close] the weirs?

There are some weirs on the Shannon, designed to keep a minimum depth in the river for navigation; there are also some natural obstacles that hold water back. But once the level has risen high enough, water simply flows over the top of the weir, and there is nothing useful anybody can do — apart, of course, from farmers’ representatives and politicians, who can always make use of a photo opportunity.

The bottleneck

Almost all the water that enters the non-tidal Shannon will eventually flow through Killaloe, the town at the southern end of Lough Derg [it’s on the west bank, in Co Clare; the east bank is Ballina, in Co Tipperary].

As James Robinson Kilroe wrote in 1907,

[…] we have the formidable barrier at Killaloe, naturally damming up a considerable depth of water in Lough Derg, and the river falling away southward by a series of rapids which correspond with drops in the canal, south of O’Briensbridge […], along an alternative course, possibly one used by a branch of the Shannon.

The diagrams with that article are worth a look.

In the twelve Irish (fifteen statute) miles between Killaloe and the tidewater at Limerick, the river falls about 100 feet: more than three times its fall from Leitrim to Killaloe. In the nineteenth century, the water level at Killaloe used to change by about eleven feet between summer and winter — even without storms.  The old Limerick Navigation, including the canal Kilroe mentioned, could drain only a small amount of water (which could put the navigation out of action); the rest went down the river’s original course through the Falls of Doonass.

The relief channel

Nowadays, the Falls of Doonass are a shadow of their former selves, and the water level through O’Briensbridge, Castleconnell and Plassey is much below its previous levels. I suspect that the older, larger trees along the river show the original level, with the newer, smaller trees having grown since the 1920s.

The cause was the construction of a relief drainage channel in the 1920s. This channel is controlled by a weir at Parteen Villa [not to be confused with Parteen]. Switch between the modern Street Map and the Historic views here to see what has happened.

Actually, of course, it’s not a relief drainage channel. The weir [sometimes referred to as the Hydro Dam] controls the flow of water to the original course of the Shannon [the right-hand or eastern channel, which gets the first 10 cubic metres of water per second] and the headrace for the hydroelectric power station at Ardnacrusha [the left-hand or western channel, which gets the next 400 cubic metres of water per second, 100 for each of its turbines]. The power station was built to use that 100-foot fall of the Shannon, concentrated between Killaloe and Limerick, to generate electricity.

But one effect of the construction of Ardnacrusha was to provide a channel, the power station headrace, capable of taking [at least] 400 cubic metres of water per second away from the original river channel, thus reducing the likelihood of flooding.

Cumec

Water experts talk about cumecs: a cumec is a flow of one cubic metre, or 1000 litres, of water per second. And a cubic metre of water weighs about one [metric] tonne, which is roughly the same as an imperial ton. So one cumec is one ton of water per second, which is a lot.

It was said, on 8 December 2015, that the ESB, using Parteen Villa Weir, had released 315 cumec down the original course of the Shannon on the previous day and had increased that to 375 cumec. If the Ardnacrusha headrace was getting 400 cumec, then the amount of water being discharged from Lough Derg and the upper Shannon had doubled.

Floods

As far as I can see, the Shannon has always flooded. The 2009 floods affected some nineteenth century houses, which I guess would have been flooded even worse before Ardnacrusha was constructed. However, I suspect that more houses have been built on the flood plain since then. But I don’t see that there is any way to prevent Shannon floods.

Envoi

There is a good article in the Irish Times of 9 December 2015; it will no doubt disappear behind a paywall at some stage.

Here is an ESB infographic about the Shannon.

ESB and the Shannon

I wrote here that I had written to the ESB, on 27 May 2015, to ask about navigation on the Shannon from Castleconnell downstream. One month later, I have not yet received a reply.

I did hear this weekend that ESB had contacted certain boat-owners to inform them that they were not to moor to the ESB embankments between Portumna and Meelick. As a riparian landowner, ESB is no doubt within its rights, but it would be interesting to know how much of the bed of the Shannon it claims to own in that area.

I have still not been able to find out, from the ESB, the clearance under its high-voltage lines crossing the Shannon (and other navigations). I gather that the ESB works on the principle that, if it provides no information, it can’t be blamed if owners of masted vessels electrocute themselves, whereas if it did provide information it might be sued. Strange that a public sector body should have such a blasé attitude to the prospect of the electrocution of the citizenry.

Perhaps if I asked questions under the Access to Information on the Environment Regulations 2007/2011 I might get replies.