Before Viagra …

MATrimony

It is much to be regretted, but indisputably certain, that many persons of both sexes are deterred from entering the married state, by infirmities which delicacy forbids them to disclose; and many married persons are rendered miserable for want of those pledges of mutual love, without which happiness is at least precarious; these circumstances are occasioned by relaxation and weakness; and it is certain that DOCTOR SMITH’S BALM OF GILEAD is the best, if not the only remedy, ever discovered for this species of debility.

When taken into the stomach, it immediately diffuses itself like a vapour through every pore, producing effects at once delightful, salutary, and permanent; it gives tone to the nerves, exhilirates [sic] the spirits, invigorates the body, and re-animates the whole man. Those deluded individuals who have injured their health by secret sensuality in their youth, or by excesses of intemperance in riper years; the nervous and debilitated of every class; the relaxed, the languid, and the exhausted, will find in this Medicine a balm, a comfort, a consolation, and remedy for all infirmities.

Prepared and Sold by Dr Smith, at his House, No 46, Marlborough-street, Dublin, where he may be consulted every day personally, or by letter, post-paid; and at PRICE’S Medical Repository, 86, Grafton-street. Price 10s, 35s and £5.

See Practical Observations (Second Edition) on Tabes Dorsalis, or Nervous Atrophy, by E Smith MD. Price 1s 6d.

Observe — DOCTOR SMITH has withdrawn his Medicine, &c from BULL’S, 79, Dame-street.

Looking after Fido

I have today sent this email to both Waterways Ireland and Clare County Council.

This email is being sent to Waterways Ireland (Scarriff office) and Clare County Council.

Let us suppose that, during the summer season (15 May to 15 September), I set  off on my boat, with my dogs, from somewhere at the northern end of Lough Derg; I moor in Mountshannon at 11.15am.

Under Clare County Council’s beach bye-laws (number 16), I may not take my dogs ashore until 6.00pm: they will be confined to Waterways Ireland’s piers and pontoons. The entire area of the car park, the access from the piers to the roads, is off limits to dogs between 11.00am and 6.00pm.

Perhaps you might, for the convenience of visiting dog-owners, designate a corridor through which dogs (on leads) might be taken to land. After all, the area in question is not actually a beach: it is a car park.

 

 

The Mountshannon dog-prison

Let us suppose that you are on a boat, with your dog, and perhaps some humans, and that you decide to visit Mountshannon, Co Clare, in the summer.

Here is a map of Mountshannon. I have stolen it from Clare County Council’s Beach Bye-Laws document, which you can download here [PDF].

Mountshannon, Co Clare

Bye-Law 16 applies to this “beach”:

16) Between the hours of 11am and 6pm during the Summer Season, it shall be prohibited to bring any dog onto any part of the beach except the exempted areas delineated on the schedule of maps attached hereto. Before 11am and after 6pm, a dog may be brought onto the non-exempted areas of the beach on the conditions that:

  • the dog is on a leash;
  • it is not causing annoyance, danger or nuisance to any person using the beach or worrying, chasing, injuring or disturbing any animals, birds or other creatures on the beach; and
  • its faeces is removed and deposited in a suitable receptacle.

There are some exceptions: guide dogs and those employed by the constabulary and the excise-persons.

The area from which dogs are excluded is shown by the hatching on the map. It covers the only exit from the piers to the shore. Thus it is not permissible to take little Fido to the land between 11.00 and 18.00 in the summer.

Little Fido had better be good at crossing his legs.

 

 

 

 

A lake museum?

Nah, it’d never work.

Headlines

From the Irish Times website at 0855 on 17 March 2019:


It seems that the second headline is about some sporting persons rather than another mass murder. Perhaps the sports department’s headline writers would benefit from sensitivity training. Or something.

Just Arrived

Royal Canal 2nd Lock (OSI 6″ ~1840)

Inland Navigation from Connaught,

A Large quantity of POTATOES, selling as follows, at the Canal Bridge, Lower Dorset-street, engaged good and Dry, at 7d per Stone. One Hundred Weight sent home to any part of the City, on the North Side of the River Liffey, for 4s 8d, carriage Free.

Encouragement to wholesale Dealers, by Grant, at the Coal and Turf Stores, Second Lock, Royal Canal.

Saunders’s News-Letter 30 June 1830

Not asking for more

At the Police-office on this day, 64 boys, inmates of Mountkennett workhouse, were brought up for effecting an entrance into the stores of the Dublin Steam Packet Company, which are underneath the workhouse, and converting to their own use 432 bottles of porter [6¾ bottles each], the property of Mr Hurley.

Tralee Chronicle 3 August 1850 citing Limerick Chronicle 31 July 1850

Header photo?

I’ve been asked what it is. Its principal claim to fame is that it is not Holyhead.

Which is just as well. You can’t drive there, unless you’re a resident: you have to walk, which will give you an appetite for a pint or two in Ty Coch.

But the inability to drive there would have made it difficult to operate car ferries.

Bleedin Brexit

What he says.

A sign of the times

Driving through the village of Castleconnell [Co Limerick] recently, I found that it had acquired one — nay, two — of those stupid signs.

Road closed display 1

They’re stupid because, with the information spread over several displays, you can’t take it all in quickly. Unless, of course, you’re prepared to focus entirely on reading the sign, ignoring everything else on and around the road. Which in this case is passing a primary school.

I suppose you could stop and photograph it ….

Road closed display 2

The information on the first two displays could have been compressed and put on one:

8AM 13th – 6PM 14th

That still leaves two displays, but on the last one, the important one, compression has been taken too far:

Road closed display 3

 

 

Road closed at X, eh? Well, there’s a useful piece of information … or it might be, if we had Long John Silver’s map, with X marking the spot.

X is, of course, the unknown quantity, so this sign is telling us that the road will be closed at a specified time but at an unspecified place.

What dictionary are road-users to consult to find the meaning of X?

And why can’t the powers-that-be communicate clearly in English?