The Officer

I see from the blatts that Dickie Fletcher, who set up the Galley cruising restaurant in New Ross, bought a boat called The Officer after the Ross and before the St Ciarán and St Brendan. I had not heard of The Officer before; I would welcome information (leave a Comment below) about its past and (if any) present.

The bells of St Clement’s

Isn’t economic history fun?

In this article, we argue that the mafia arose as a response to an exogenous shock in the demand for oranges and lemons, following Lind’s discovery in the late eighteenth century that citrus fruits cured scurvy. More specifically, we claim that mafia appeared in locations where producers made high profits from citrus production for overseas export.

h/t Matt Levine, the thinking man’s guide to Wall Street.

 

Maggie May: Liverpool 1840

Brothels

31st December 1839: 591
31st December 1840: 568
Decrease: 23

Number of those existing in 1839 which were still open on 31st December 1840: 435
Number opened in 1840: 133
Number closed in 1840: 156

Proprietors having given up keeping these houses: 88
Proprietors having been reformed: 35
Proprietors in prison: 20
Proprietors having been transported: 4
Proprietors having died: 9

Number of prostitutes 31st December 1839: 2057
Number of prostitutes 31st December 1840: 2083
Increase: 26

Average number in each house: 3½

Houses, not Brothels, in which Prostitutes lodge

31st December 1839: 184
31st December 1840: 199
Decrease: 15

Number of those existing in 1839 which were still open on 31st December 1840: 156
Number opened in 1840: 43
Number closed in 1840: 28

Proprietors having given up keeping these houses: 19
Proprietors having been reformed: 8
Proprietors having died: 1

Number of prostitutes 31st December 1839: 347
Number of prostitutes 31st December 1840: 406
Increase: 59

Average number in each house: 2

Source

Adapted from Table No 181 “Statement of the number of brothels, prostitutes, prostitutes’ lodging houses, mendicant’s [sic] lodging houses, and houses for the reception of stolen property, within the jurisdiction of the Liverpool Police, during the year 1840” in Tables of the Revenue, Population, Commerce, &c of the United Kingdom and its Dependencies Part X 1840 compiled from official returns HMSO London 1842

 

 

 

 

Killaloe Bridge

A new bridge for Killaloe:

We may here state that in the projected improvements of the Shannon, the rapids will be lowered, a new bridge erected, and the navigation of the river between Killaloe and Limerick materially altered.

James Fraser, Landscape Gardener and Designer of Rural Improvements A Hand Book for Travellers in Ireland, descriptive of its scenery, towns, seats, antiquities, etc with various statistical tables. Also an outline of its mineral structure, a brief view of its botany, and information for anglers William Curry, Jun and Company, Dublin; Longman and Company, London; Fraser and Co, Edinburgh 1844

It took a while, but the new bridge seems to be on its way. The old bridge — which has been altered in many ways over the years — has done enough and deserves to be relieved of the volume of traffic crossing it daily.

Anyone intending to create any further delays to the bypass should be invited to go and boil his or her head.

 

Lough Derg Regatta 1834 (b)

Yesterday I posted a notice from the Limerick Chronicle of 20 August 1834, outlining the schedule of events for the regatta to be held on Lough Derg later that month.

In a comment, Vincent Delany M.A. (Hist.) said

Lough Derg YC was founded c. 1836 but regattas to approx the same format existed on Lough Derg before the formalising of the yacht club.

My thesis ‘yachting and yachtsmen on the Shannon 1830s to 1930s’ discussed the issues extensively.

I have not seen the thesis, alas, but I thought I’d see what else the invaluable British Newspaper Archive had on the subject. The first result was that there was no mention, in any newspaper, of a Lough Derg regatta before 1834. I have not attempted to search for all possible terms involving sailing boats, races, yachts and so on; I think I can say that the 1834 event was the first on Lough Derg to be designated a regatta.

There had been similar events on the estuary before then: the Limerick Chronicle of 30 July 1834 reported the early events of the Royal Western Yacht Club’s regatta at Kilrush. Just below that it said

The Committee of the Lough Derg Regatta met at Killaloe on Friday, when a Commodore, Stewards, Secretary, and Treasurer, were appointed.

The 1834 regatta was covered by The Pilot on 29 August 1834. At the time, the term “upper Shannon” distinguished the freshwater from the tidewater: “lower Shannon” meant the estuary.

LOUGH DERGH REGATTA

Lough Dergh Regatta, Upper Shannon, commenced on Tuesday under most favourable auspices. The beautiful scenery of that romantic region will now be seen to great advantage, and many visiters [sic] have left to enjoy the treat. On Wednesday the boat races were to take place at Killaloe, and the Messrs Paterson, from Kilrush, 70 miles distant, on the Lower Shannon, have entered to contest the prize in that department. The band of the 91st Regiment, from Limerick, attended the regatta.

There were not less than ten thousand people assembled on the shores at Williamstown and Drumineer [sic] to witness the scene on Tuesday, and the Lake was literally covered with row boats, filled with ladies and gentlemen. There were five yachts started for the challenge cup, from Drumineer to Holy Island and back. The Corsair, Mr White, came in first; Ida, Mr Bailey, second; and Thomas, Lieut Tully RN, third.

There were only three minutes between those three boats — the others were not placed. Wednesday’s race was to be run by the same boats, for the Salver; and on Thursday the rowing matches take place at Killaloe. The Lady Lansdown [sic] steamer attended, and was crowded to excess, so much so that they were obliged to refuse taking more company on board.

A somewhat confused reporter there, but never mind. Interesting to note that Tom Bailey was navigating Ida around the Shannon way back then: he must be older than he looks.

The Northern Whig of 4 September 1834 added a little colour:

This Regatta commenced on Tuesday sen, as we announced, and the numerous gentry who attended from the adjoining counties, fully realized the anticipations we had formed of its attractions. The delightful scenery of the Upper Lakes, enlivened by the gay yachts, crowded with beauty and fashion, floating on their bosoms, had a most pleasing effect.

So many visiters [sic] arrived at Killaloe, to enjoy the diverting sport, that it became almost impossible to procure even ordinary entertainment. […]

In the following year, the Roscommon and Leitrim Gazette (18 July 1835) reported that

The Lough Derg Yacht Club have adopted the rules and regulations of the Royal Western Yacht Club, and the Regatta commences at Killaloe, the 23d inst; Dromineer, the 24th, and at Williamstown, the 25th instant.

Whose idea was it?

My interest in this topic is in the involvement of Lieut John Tully RN. He visited Limerick in 1829 to make arrangements for the arrival of the first City of Dublin Steam Packet Company [CoDSPCo] steamer to operate on the Shannon, the Mona. It was replaced later that year by the Kingstown, which Tully captained for some time. In 1831 he was the company’s Limerick agent (John Grantham was its acting manager) and from then on, for the rest of his working life, he seems to have been an agent or otherwise working for or with the Company; he spent much time as Agent at Killaloe and later at Athlone. The yacht he sailed in 1834, the Thomas, may have belonged to the company’s founder, Charles Wye Williams, who in 1829 had a 10-ton schooner of that name at Liverpool.

Tully was Secretary and Treasurer of the first Lough Derg Regatta. It involved the provision of special packet boat services on the Limerick Navigation (controlled by a company strongly associated with the CoDSPCo. The regatta spent one day at Killaloe, where the company owned a hotel, and another at Williamstown, its private harbour, where it likewise owned a hotel. It also used either one or two of the company’s Lough Derg steamers.

Most importantly, though, it attracted visitors to Lough Derg, and thus supported the CoDSPCo’s marketing efforts. They included sponsorship of publications, special attention to visiting writers and large-scale advertising.

None of this is evidence that the CoDSPCo invented the Lough Derg Regatta, but I would not be surprised to find that it was at least an early and enthusiastic supporter of the concept.

For an account of a later Lough Derg Regatta, that of 1849, see here.

 

Header

Capt Basil Hall‘s novel principle of fitting the wheel at the head in place of the stern, is adopted by the London and Westminster Steam boat company in their vessels.

Limerick Chronicle 11 April 1838

It would be nice to have an illustration ….

Lough Derg Regatta 1834 (a)

THIS REGATTA has been got up in a spirited manner by the Gentlemen of the Counties of Tipperary, Galway, and Clare, and will commence on TUESDAY, the 26th instant, between Drumineer and Williamstown, and will continue for three days successively. The gig and cot races will be held at Killaloe, on the last day. The Lady Clanricarde steam vessel will attend on the lake each day, and two morning packets will start from Limerick at six o’clock AM and return in the evening for the accommodation of the Public.

First Day’s Sailing, August 26

A Challenge Cup, value 30 guineas, to be won two years in succession. Three minutes to a ton allowed to smaller vessels open to all classes. Entrance one guinea.

Same Day

Cot race for three sovereigns for boats pulling two oars. — No race unless 4 start. Entrance 2s 6d.

Second Day, August 27

Time race sailing match. Entrance 1 guinea. Four to start, or no race — for Salver, value 10 guineas.

Same Day

A cot race for three sovereigns for cots pulling two oars. Entrance 2s 6d.

Third Day at Killaloe, August 28

Sailing match for sweepstakes, for the beaten boats. — One guinea entrance.

Same Day

A gig race, rowed and steered by Gentlemen, pulling 4 or 6 oars, for a silver snuff box, with a purse of 5 sovereigns, to be added by the Stewards. Entrance 2s 6d per oar. — Three boats to start or no race.

Same Day

A gig race, pulling 4 or 6 oars, for 6 sovereigns. Entrance 2s 6d per oar. Three to start or no race.

Same Day

A cot race, pulled by women, for £3. Three or no race.

Same Day

Flat cots for 3 sovereigns. First cot 2 sovereigns. Second cot 1 sovereign. Four to start or no race.

JOHN TULLY Lt RN Sec and Treasurer

NB Members &c on entering their yachts, must send their names, class, and tonnage, to the Secretary, four days previous to the days of sailing, and pay the regulated entrance at the same time.

JOHN TULLY, Secretary
Killaloe, August 20

Limerick Chronicle 20 August 1834

Update 8 January 2018

For more on the early Lough Derg regattas, see this piece. And here is an earlier piece about the Lough Derg Regatta of 1849.

Eau de Cologne

Let’s send Boxer Moran to Germany.

Shannon flooding

First, a caveat. The links below are to a site called Brinkwire, about which I have found little independent information. I cannot say that the site is safe to visit or that its information is reliable.

The site itself says that it is

… a news hub for blogs, online communities, content affiliates, publishers and members of the connected internet who are interested in commercial news.

Brinkwire charges PR agencies, marketing agencies and in-house communication teams to upload their news to our hub.

The story about the Shannon is here. It says (inter alia)

The plight of a suckler farmer on the banks of the River Shannon in Co Offaly encapsulates the many challenges facing small Irish farmers today.

Paddy Towey (63), who has been farming in Shannon Harbour for over 10 years, had tears in his eyes as he expressed his belief that this season may well be his last.

[…]

He was pleased to hear that work was planned to remove the top portion of Meelick Weir, but he said the measure has come too late for him.

Mr Towey has been affected by floods.

The story is said to be “BY BRINKWIRE ON “; it is not clear what PR agency, marketing agency or in-house communication team might have placed it there.

 

Thanks to Ewan Duffy for the link to this story about an early steamer on Lough Erne. The Clones Sheugh comes into it too.

Here is a piece about the later steam yacht Firefly at Crom.