The sounds of Pontcysyllte

The latest soundscape from the Canal & River Trust features the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct with, on one side, the canal basin at Trevor and, on the other, Whitehouses Tunnel. Take five and a half minutes off to listen.

The site itself is well worth a visit, even if you just walk across the aqueduct and back. It’s off the A5, Telford’s road: after coming from Ireland by ferry, you could take that road — older, slower but more scenic — from Holyhead instead of the A55 coastal route.

h/t our Yorkshire correspondent

Header photo 20191202

Looking towards Clondra Lock.

Was it with the clout of a loy?

He had attended at the assizes as a grand juror, and an indictment was preferred against a man for murder, who was placed in the dock charged with that offence, and a witness was called to prove the case for the prosecution. On his examination, however, it was discovered that he was no other than the murdered man himself. There was the man indicted for murder, and arraigned on the indictment, and the first witness called was the man whom he was accused of having murdered.

On finding that this indictment could not be sustained in consequence of this somewhat remarkable mistake, one of the jury applied to know whether it was a case in which they could find a bill for manslaughter. In fact it turned out, that a severe assault only, had been committed, and yet this was a case, in which a return might have been made, both of the charge of murder and manslaughter, although the man supposed to be murdered was actually living.

Thomas Spring Rice MP, Chancellor of the Exchequer, House of Commons, 15 April 1839

ITMA

A heartfelt musical tribute to Boris Johnson.

What Dublin commuters need

Just the thing for cycling along the canal into work, although the locks might be a problem.

I do hope …

… that the chap in the suit isn’t going to do what I think he’s going to do with that sheep.

Del Harding …

… of Bealkelly Woods (south side of Scarriff Bay) here.

Sir George Hill

I am a great admirer and frequent user of Wikipedia, and make a small financial contribution to it each year (I’ll give more once I win the lottery). But some of its biographical articles about long-dead folk are less than fully accurate, perhaps because they’re based on older sources, more inclined to be polite about their subjects.

Here, for example, is the Wikipedia piece about Sir George Hill, an ornament of the Orange Order who was an MP and Vice-Treasurer of Ireland. Not a hint there that Hill was at the very least careless and utterly incompetent as Vice-Treasurer. Here is what Thomas Spring Rice said about Hill in the House of Commons on 31 August 1831, after Hill had escaped to become Governor of Saint Vincent:

[…] between five and six years ago, a balance of several hundred pounds had been due from the Vice-Treasurer of Ireland to the public. At that period the Treasury arranged that £10000 should be issued annually, on account, to the Vice-Treasurer, and that he should every year deliver in his attested account, duly vouched, of the expenditure of the money, in the same way as all other public officers.

Urgent and repeated calls had been made upon the Vice-Treasurer to render his accounts; but this he had neglected to do, alleging, as his reason, that the difficulty arose from a part of the papers being in Ireland and a part in England, and making various other excuses.

At length the Vice-Treasurer, Sir George Hill, was appointed Governor of St. Vincent’s, in the West Indies, and he left this country without rendering any account whatever of the public money intrusted to his care. In consequence of further applications, Sir George Hill had at last rendered in his accounts, but they were unsupported by vouchers, and were altogether in a condition which made it impossible that they could be audited, examined, or passed.

Assuming, however, that the accounts were correct, it appeared by Sir George Hill’s own showing, that he was in debt to the public the sum of £2180. He had been called upon to pay this balance, and to put his accounts in a state, so that it might be ascertained whether he was not indebted to a larger amount.

Neither of these requisitions had he complied with, but he had written to the Treasury Board to say, that his nephew, Mr Hill, who was in Ireland, would pay the balance for him. Application had consequently been made to this Mr Hill, and the only result was, that that gentleman had declared his willingness to pay the money when Sir George Hill directed him to do so. This he supposed Sir George had not done, for the money had not yet been paid.

You can read the full debate here; Daniel O’Connell put his finger on it:

Mr. O’Connell thought he was now justified in calling this matter a neat bit of peculation.

The History of Parliament has more on Hill here.

On 18 July 1832 Thomas Spring Rice reported to the House of Commons that

… the sum which had been due from Sir George Hill, the late Vice-Treasurer of Ireland, to the Government, had all been paid up.

He did not say who paid it.

The Christmas Panto …

… in Copenhagen: The Three Brexiteers.

h/t Richard Murphy

Another adventurous person

“The O’Gorman” Mahon