Tag Archives: Grand Canal

Grand Canal carrying 1816

GRAND CANAL

Reduction of Freights etc

B Hyland and Sons return their most grateful Thanks to their Friends and the Public, for the very flattering Encouragement they have received since their commencement in Business, above 20 years, and hope, that by their constant care and attention to merit a continuance thereof. They now take the opportunity of acquainting the Friends of their Trade, that all goods committed to their care, will be forwarded as usual, with the utmost expedition. Three of their Boats leave Dublin every week, for the conveyance of all kinds of Building Materials; Wines, Spirits, Porter, Tea, Sugar, Cotton Goods, and all kinds of Merchandize &c, at tge following reduced Prices, viz:

Dublin to Rathangan                                        8s 10d per Ton
Do. to Monastereven                                      10s    6d do.
Do. to Vicarstown                                            12s    4d do.
Do. to Athy                                                        14s    2d do,

They beg leave to state to their Friends and the Public that they have got each of their Boats Hatched (so that it is impossible for Goods to meet with the slightest injury) and each Hatch is properly iron barred, with cross bars of Iron, in the most secure manner, and the moment the Goods are put into each Boat, the Hatches are put on, and locked down with brass-warded Locks of the best description, and then sealed. Each of their Agents at the above-named Stages have counter keys to open the Boats to get out the necessary Goods that is for each place. They have also provided excellent Stores at each of the above Harbours, for the general accommodation of all those who are pleased to favour them with the carriage of their Goods.

They return their best thanks to the Grand Canal Company, for their having so kindly reduced their Tolls, by which means they are thus enabled to carry Goods at the above Rates, and also to carry all kinds of Goods, Flour, Meal, Malt, Corn, &c at the under-mentioned rate of Freight to Dublin, where three of their regular fast-sailing Boats arrive each week from the country.

Athy to Dublin                                                 12s   6d per Ton
Vicarstown to do.                                            11s    6d do.
Monastereven to do.                                      10s    6d do.
Rathangan to do.                                              8s  10d do.

Exclusive of the above arrangement they have also commenced plying another Boat drawn by two Horses, which Boat leaves Monastereven every Friday evening at Four o’Clock, and arrives in Dublin on the Saturday night following; this same Boat leaves Dublin every Tuesday morning at Five o’Clock, and arrives in Monastereven on the Wednesday evening following.

They hereby give notice, that any Grain or Corn that may come by their Boats, in bulk, to Dublin, will not be entitled to the above reduction of Freight; but if the Owners of such Grain or Corn, put it into Sacks, they will then be only charged at the above-mentioned Rates (so regulated and ordered by the Grand Canal Company).

They have also established Drays with Covers for the accommodation of their Customers in Dublin, and also in the Country, for the purpose of delivering all kinds of Goods that may be conveyed by their Boats to their respective Owners.

Samples are taken from all Wines and Spirits sent to their care, the instant they are laid down off the cars, in the presence of the Carrier, in small Vial Bottles, sealed, one of which is sent to the Owners, the other retained as a proof; and they are in all cases accountable.

Their Boat Agents are Mr Henry Farrell, at Rathangan; Mr John Coyle, at Monastereven; Mr Thomas Doyle, at Vicarstown; and Mr Michael Commins, at Athy; each of whom are purchasers of Grain, and will give the full value for Wheat, Bere, Barley, Oats and Rapeseed.

Wanted, 800 new Hemp Sacks of the best Irish Manufacture; each Sack must weigh 7 lb exactly standing beam.

They have always a large supply of the best KILKENNY COALS, on reasonable Terms.

Dublin Evening Post 12 September 1816

Canal fecundity

Mrs M’Cann, of Castlecomer, gave birth to two infant boys and a girl, in the canal fly boat from Athy to Dublin, on Monday.

Limerick Chronicle 3 March 1838

Just as well they were infants: giving birth to three teenagers would have been difficult.

The power of the wind

The fly-boat from Ballinasloe was much retarded in its progress on Monday by the storm. The horses which pulled it were twice driven into the canal by the force of the wind between that town and Shannon Harbour.

Limerick Chronicle 21 November 1840

Saving Miss Gibson

On Friday, as “the Archer”, Grand Canal passage [passenger] boat, was proceeding from Dublin, Miss Gibson, of Parsonstown, one of the passengers, fell from the landing place, leading to the state cabin, into the canal, between the 11th and 12th locks. The boat was going rapidly at the time, and the lady was whirled under the water, and would inevitably have been drowned, but for the heroic decision of a young gentleman, son of Captain Brennan, of Strangford, county of Down, who instantly jumped from on board, and with the assistance of the master of the boat, and a countryman, rescued her from her impending fate.

Limerick Chronicle 28 May 1834

The Archer, built in 1805, was sold in 1834, according to the list of passage boats in Ruth Delany The Grand Canal of Ireland David & Charles, Newton Abbot 1973.

The Four Pots tramway

Ewan Duffy has an interesting post here about a tramway from a quarry to the bank of the Grand Canal beside the Four Pots.

 

Who fears to speak of 98?

It’s one less than 99, I suppose. But the answer might be the Grand Canal Company.

The Grand Canal corps of infantry, commanded by Captain Greene, mount guard every night at the Canal harbour, which gives additional safety to that place.

Dublin Evening Post 5 January 1797

WAR-OFFICE, DUBLIN-CASTLE, 5th JAN 1797

His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant has been pleased to sign Commissions for the following Gentlemen to be officers in the under-mentioned district corps.

[…]

Grand Canal Infantry — 2d lieut J Wemys Disney, 1st lieut vice [ie in place of] Black, resigned, and Jas Murray Barton, Esq; 2d do

Dublin Evening Post 10 January 1797

Andrew Hamilton Esq was later commissioned as a 3d lieut in the Grand Canal Infantry [Saunders’s News-Letter 8 April 1797]. William Greene, the captain, was Company Secretary in real life.

The usual military guards in the Earl of Meath’s Liberty were sustained by the St Sepulchre’s infantry, from which they were yesterday relieved by the Revenue corps — and the stores of the Grand Canal Company were protected by the Canal corps.

Dublin Evening Post 5 October 1797

There was a big parade in November 1797.

GRAND CANAL CORPS OF INFANTRY

At a meeting of the Grand Canal Corps of Infantry, on parade, Saturday the 4th day of November, the following Address, with an elegant Stand of Colours, were presented by Mrs WILLIAM GREENE.

“With infinite satisfaction I have the honour of presenting this Stand of Colours to you, as a tribute of the high esteem I entertain for the fidelity and zeal you have, in every instance since your enrolment, evinced for the important cause in which you are engaged. Our recent brilliant victory, will, I trust, prevent the necessity of your being exposed to the dangers we had reason to expect, though I feel the most perfect confidence, should any arise, that you will protect these Colours with the same spirit, courage, and loyalty, your conduct has hitherto manifested.

“Cordiality, united with valour, will, I am persuaded, on every occasion crown with success your laudable exertions in support of our King and happy Constitution, the blessings attendant on which you must feel more peculiarly sensible of this day, animated by reflecting on the example of that Monarch, the anniversary of whose birth you are assembled to commemorate.”

To which the Corps returned the following Answer.

“Madam

“With heartfelt thanks we receive your much valued favour, perfectly sensible of the honour conferred on us, which is heightened by the gracious manner with which you have presented us these Colours, from which we are determined never to desert, but to retain them with that spirit and firmness which have through ages signalized our Country for loyalty to our King, and attachment to our glorious Constitution.

“Your very high opinion of us, as Soldiers, is really most flattering to us, but it is our duty as well as our wish to act, in every situation, for the support of our Constitution with the zeal and ardour that become Soldiers and become Men.”

Resolved, That the corps be specially summoned to meet on Friday next, for the purpose of ascertaining the portion of pay to be appropriated to the relief of the widows and orphans of the brave men who fell under the command of Lord Duncan.

Resolved unanimously, that the foregoing address and resolution be inserted in Saunders’s News-letter, the Dublin Evening Post, and Faulkner’s Journal.

By Order, Arthur Disney, Sec.
Parade, 4th November, 1797

According to David Dickson [David Dickson Dublin: the making of a capital city Profile Books, London pb 2015], in 1798 Dublin city had 12 infantry and 7 cavalry corps of yeomen, with another 12 corps in the county. Of those in the city, 7 were organised by district, 7 by profession or guild and 4 by institutions: the Linen Hall, Trinity College, the Custom House and the Grand Canal company.

They constituted a vast, highly visible and overwhelmingly loyalist force, the enforcers of what many, perhaps most, citizens now regarded as a hostile political order.

 

Carrying on the Grand Canal around 1800

Some new items about early carrying on the Grand Canal or by the Grand Canal Company.

Waterways update: work in progress (1759)

Here is some information about the work of Messrs Ockenden and Omer on Irish waterways up to 1759. It is extracted from a book by Henry Brooke; Ockenden had, twenty years earlier, subscribed to support Brooke’s play. It is not impossible that they were acquainted, in Ireland or in England. Apart from anything else, both were supporters of Frederick, Prince of Wales: see A N Newman “The Political Patronage of Frederick Lewis, Prince of Wales” in The Historical Journal Vol 1 No 1 1958 on Ockenden’s post in the prince’s household at £100 a year and here on Frederick’s “many attentions” to Brooke.

Brooke’s account contains some information about Ockenden’s work that I have not seen elsewhere. I found the reference to Brooke in Thomas McIlvenna This Wonder-Working Canal: a history of the Tyrone Navigation Coalisland Canal Branch IWAI 2005.

Hooks

Statutory Instrument No 198 of 1964

GRAND CANAL BYE-LAW (CONFIRMATION) ORDER, 1964

I, ERSKINE H CHILDERS, Minister for Transport and Power, in exercise of the powers conferred on me by section 22 of the Transport Act, 1950 (No 12 of 1950), and the Transport, Fuel and Power (Transfer of Departmental Administration and Ministerial Functions) Order, 1959 (SI No 125 of 1959), hereby order as follows:

  1. This Order may be cited as the Grand Canal Bye-law (Confirmation) Order, 1964.
  2. The bye-law (set out in the Schedule to this Order) made by Córas Iompair Éireann on the 7th day of November, 1963, in lieu of Bye-law No 37 (confirmed by the Grand Canal Bye-law (Confirmation) Order, 1953 (SI No 162 of 1953)) is hereby confirmed and shall come into operation on the 5th day of August, 1964.

SCHEDULE

No person navigating any vessel on the canal shall have on board the same—

(1) passengers or persons exceeding twelve in number in addition to her duly appointed crew; or

(2) any scythe, hook, or other instrument for cutting grass or corn unless the same bona fide forms part of the cargo carried for hire; nor shall any such person use the same on the canal or towing-path, or on any land adjoining the canal or towing-path.

GIVEN under my Official Seal, this 5th day of August, 1964.

ERSKINE H CHILDERS, Minister for Transport and Power

EXPLANATORY NOTE

The effect of this Order is to remove the restrictions imposed by the former Bye-law No 37 of the Grand Canal Bye-laws on the carrying of firearms and fishing tackle on vessels traversing the Grand Canal.

Stolen from www.irishstatutebook.ie

The Dublin gondola

Letter in the Irish Times here.