Category Archives: Operations

Not asking for more

At the Police-office on this day, 64 boys, inmates of Mountkennett workhouse, were brought up for effecting an entrance into the stores of the Dublin Steam Packet Company, which are underneath the workhouse, and converting to their own use 432 bottles of porter [6¾ bottles each], the property of Mr Hurley.

Tralee Chronicle 3 August 1850 citing Limerick Chronicle 31 July 1850

The cows of death

On Wednesday, a melancholy accident, attended with the loss of nine lives, occurred on Lough Derg, on the Upper [ie non-tidal] Shannon, by the upsetting of a boat in its passage across the lake from Williamstown to Dromineer. The nine men were jobbers, six of them belonging to Nenagh, and three to Cork, and were returning from a fair in the county Galway.

The accident is said to have been owing to their having carried two cows with them yoked to the boat, one of which, having burst the ties that confined it, became unmanageable, and in a few minutes the boat being upset, all on board were engulphed in the deep.

The Warder and Dublin Weekly Mail 3 March 1849, quoting Limerick Reporter

Shave and a haircut

Scarriff Harbour after a haircut

Looking downriver

I hope that the same is being done on the Shannon—Erne Waterway.

Newry: canal, steam railways, ships …

Thanks to Andrew Waldron for the link to this film, The Clanrye Connection, about Newry and its transport systems: the inland canal, the ship canal and the railways. The film was made by the BBC in 1996 and is about 50 minutes long.

There is even an electric tram.

 

Problems on the Rhine

No, not the one in Co Clare.

No German officers

Ballinlaw Ferry: much more info

For many people, the first thing to look out for on a Friday morning is Andrew Doherty’s weekly posting on his Waterford Harbour Tides and Tales blog. Today’s subject is the Ballinlaw ferry on the Barrow: I had a bit of information  here (and a question here) but for the full story read Andrew’s account.

The power of the wind

The fly-boat from Ballinasloe was much retarded in its progress on Monday by the storm. The horses which pulled it were twice driven into the canal by the force of the wind between that town and Shannon Harbour.

Limerick Chronicle 21 November 1840

Saving Miss Gibson

On Friday, as “the Archer”, Grand Canal passage [passenger] boat, was proceeding from Dublin, Miss Gibson, of Parsonstown, one of the passengers, fell from the landing place, leading to the state cabin, into the canal, between the 11th and 12th locks. The boat was going rapidly at the time, and the lady was whirled under the water, and would inevitably have been drowned, but for the heroic decision of a young gentleman, son of Captain Brennan, of Strangford, county of Down, who instantly jumped from on board, and with the assistance of the master of the boat, and a countryman, rescued her from her impending fate.

Limerick Chronicle 28 May 1834

The Archer, built in 1805, was sold in 1834, according to the list of passage boats in Ruth Delany The Grand Canal of Ireland David & Charles, Newton Abbot 1973.

They killed Kenny!

Annabeg, Annaghbeg, Plassy or Plassey Lock on the Limerick Navigation (OSI 6″ ~1840)

 

Last Sunday a young man of the name of Kenny, bathing in one of the locks of the Canal, near Annabeg, was unfortunately drowned; the sluices of the gates happened to be open, through which the poor lad was drawn from the great suction, and his head very much shattered.

Saunders’s News-Letter 30 July 1803

Who fears to speak of 98?

It’s one less than 99, I suppose. But the answer might be the Grand Canal Company.

The Grand Canal corps of infantry, commanded by Captain Greene, mount guard every night at the Canal harbour, which gives additional safety to that place.

Dublin Evening Post 5 January 1797

WAR-OFFICE, DUBLIN-CASTLE, 5th JAN 1797

His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant has been pleased to sign Commissions for the following Gentlemen to be officers in the under-mentioned district corps.

[…]

Grand Canal Infantry — 2d lieut J Wemys Disney, 1st lieut vice [ie in place of] Black, resigned, and Jas Murray Barton, Esq; 2d do

Dublin Evening Post 10 January 1797

Andrew Hamilton Esq was later commissioned as a 3d lieut in the Grand Canal Infantry [Saunders’s News-Letter 8 April 1797]. William Greene, the captain, was Company Secretary in real life.

The usual military guards in the Earl of Meath’s Liberty were sustained by the St Sepulchre’s infantry, from which they were yesterday relieved by the Revenue corps — and the stores of the Grand Canal Company were protected by the Canal corps.

Dublin Evening Post 5 October 1797

There was a big parade in November 1797.

GRAND CANAL CORPS OF INFANTRY

At a meeting of the Grand Canal Corps of Infantry, on parade, Saturday the 4th day of November, the following Address, with an elegant Stand of Colours, were presented by Mrs WILLIAM GREENE.

“With infinite satisfaction I have the honour of presenting this Stand of Colours to you, as a tribute of the high esteem I entertain for the fidelity and zeal you have, in every instance since your enrolment, evinced for the important cause in which you are engaged. Our recent brilliant victory, will, I trust, prevent the necessity of your being exposed to the dangers we had reason to expect, though I feel the most perfect confidence, should any arise, that you will protect these Colours with the same spirit, courage, and loyalty, your conduct has hitherto manifested.

“Cordiality, united with valour, will, I am persuaded, on every occasion crown with success your laudable exertions in support of our King and happy Constitution, the blessings attendant on which you must feel more peculiarly sensible of this day, animated by reflecting on the example of that Monarch, the anniversary of whose birth you are assembled to commemorate.”

To which the Corps returned the following Answer.

“Madam

“With heartfelt thanks we receive your much valued favour, perfectly sensible of the honour conferred on us, which is heightened by the gracious manner with which you have presented us these Colours, from which we are determined never to desert, but to retain them with that spirit and firmness which have through ages signalized our Country for loyalty to our King, and attachment to our glorious Constitution.

“Your very high opinion of us, as Soldiers, is really most flattering to us, but it is our duty as well as our wish to act, in every situation, for the support of our Constitution with the zeal and ardour that become Soldiers and become Men.”

Resolved, That the corps be specially summoned to meet on Friday next, for the purpose of ascertaining the portion of pay to be appropriated to the relief of the widows and orphans of the brave men who fell under the command of Lord Duncan.

Resolved unanimously, that the foregoing address and resolution be inserted in Saunders’s News-letter, the Dublin Evening Post, and Faulkner’s Journal.

By Order, Arthur Disney, Sec.
Parade, 4th November, 1797

According to David Dickson [David Dickson Dublin: the making of a capital city Profile Books, London pb 2015], in 1798 Dublin city had 12 infantry and 7 cavalry corps of yeomen, with another 12 corps in the county. Of those in the city, 7 were organised by district, 7 by profession or guild and 4 by institutions: the Linen Hall, Trinity College, the Custom House and the Grand Canal company.

They constituted a vast, highly visible and overwhelmingly loyalist force, the enforcers of what many, perhaps most, citizens now regarded as a hostile political order.