Category Archives: Charles Wye Williams

Not asking for more

At the Police-office on this day, 64 boys, inmates of Mountkennett workhouse, were brought up for effecting an entrance into the stores of the Dublin Steam Packet Company, which are underneath the workhouse, and converting to their own use 432 bottles of porter [6¾ bottles each], the property of Mr Hurley.

Tralee Chronicle 3 August 1850 citing Limerick Chronicle 31 July 1850

Header photo?

I’ve been asked what it is. Its principal claim to fame is that it is not Holyhead.

Which is just as well. You can’t drive there, unless you’re a resident: you have to walk, which will give you an appetite for a pint or two in Ty Coch.

But the inability to drive there would have made it difficult to operate car ferries.

Ennis to Dublin 1838

The public car from Ennis to Williamstown was quite a treat in the way of public travelling; a leather strap, and afterwards a branch of a tree, sufficed for a whip, until an innocent country lad was coaxed into an exchange pro tempore — that is to say, he very good-naturedly lent our driver his whip on a simple promise to return it, and took the branch instead. Although half an hour too late at starting, our loquacious conductor assured us that we would arrive in due time at Williamstown to meet the packet, ‘barring accidents’ — which was well put in, for the wheels were once or twice so hot and the horses so lazy that a stoppage at one time seemed inevitable.

A voyage in a large steamboat of one hundred horse power was quite a novelty to be enjoyed in an inland piece of water, and I greatly enjoyed both this and the voyage up the Shannon, in a less steamboat of twenty four horse power. I had never in my life travelled in a canal passage-boat, and the voyage therein from Shannon Harbour to Dublin was described by a Limerick attorney as a nuisance, horrible beyond endurance. I have never, however, been disposed to rely so much on the opinion of others as on my own experience, and therefore I resolved to try the voyage.

Never was I more agreeably surprised that to find, after sailing in it eighteen hours, I arrived at Dublin too soon, so far as the pleasantness of the journey was concerned. I heard the best Irish songs and recitations, and had a most interesting account of Irish scenery and superstitions from Mr Dennis Leonard, of Kilrush; besides this, I had a very comfortable night’s rest and was altogether much interested and pleased with my first journey on a canal.

From Chapter XV Ireland and the Irish 1838 of Benjamin Ward Richardson Thomas Sopwith MA CE FRS, with excerpts from his diary of fifty-seven years Longmans, Green & Co, London 1891

 

 

The Lough Derg Pinnace Club

Lough Derg Pinnace Club

Regatta

To take place off Williamstown Hotel
On MONDAY, the 20th of SEPTEMBER, 1841.
Viscount AVONMORE, Commodore

Sailing Committee: John Burke Esq, Tintrim; Chas Walnutt Esq, Limerick;
W A Minnett Esq, Annabeg

A SILVER Challenge Cup, value 12 Guineas, with the Entrances, to be sailed for by Pinnaces — to start at 12 o’clock. Three to start or no Race. Entrance — Half a Guinea.

A Cot Race, to start at One, pm. Three to start, or no Race.

Three sovereigns added to an Entrance of Five Shillings, to be pulled for in four-oared Gigs. Three to start, or no Race.

A Cot Race, to start at 3 pm. Three to start or no Race.

A Donkey Race, to take place at 4 pm for a Bridle presented by John Burke of Tintrim Esq.

All persons entering Boats for the above Prizes must send their names to the Treasurer previous to the day of Sailing, and the regulated Entrance at the same time.

W H MINNETT, Treasurer

Annabeg, Nenagh, Sept 11

A Dejeune will be prepared at Mr MILLS’ Hotel, Williamstown, at Four o’clock, OM. Tickets, including wine — Gentlemen, 5s; Ladies, 2s 6d to be had of the Committee and the following Gentlemen — Walter Blake Esq, Meelick; Philip Reade Esq, Woodpark; Edmond Burke Esq, Tintrim, and Francis Drew Esq.

September 11

Limerick Chronicle 11 September 1841

Carrying on the Grand Canal around 1800

Some new items about early carrying on the Grand Canal or by the Grand Canal Company.

The Lough Gill Steam Company

Annual report of the Lough Gill Steam Company

Rev Thomas M’Keon, in the Chair

According to the Deed of Settlement, the Accounts are now laid before the Shareholders, and your Committee have the pleasure of recommending a dividend of 7 per Cent, still leaving a balance on hands as a surplus fund. This being her maiden year, during the first six months very few people travelled by the Steam Boat, the people being deterred by superstitious stories; but your Committee are enabled to state, that for the last six months, the passenger traffic has increased 350 per cent, with a prospect of a still further increase.

Lough Gill (OSI 25″)

Most of the passengers come from Drumkeerin, Doury, Dabally, and the country beyond the River Shannon, who are enabled by this conveyance to go to the Sligo Market, and return home the same day, thus travelling upwards of 50 Irish miles. From Manorhamilton and Glenfarn few passengers have as yet come, but it is hoped they will find this the best, cheapest, and quickest route, the fares for nine Irish miles being only 6d in cabin, and 3d on deck. If the contemplated road to Glenfarn by Gurtermore was opened, a passenger trade from Enniskillen (in 4½ hours from Sligo), Blacklion, Glenfarn, almost equal to her present trade, might be fairly expected. The Committee recommend all means to be used to get this road, about 3½ miles long, to be opened.

The number of passengers for six months ending October were:

Cabin 3240        Deck 12932

Your Committee would advise a system of Tickets for Passengers. The improvements of the Shannon are rapidly progressing, and when finished (in about 2 years) will, in conjunction with the Athlone Railway, open an immense passenger traffic on this line, the City of Dublin Company having offered to run powerful Steamers in conjunction with this Company to the Railway, bringing all the passengers between Sligo and Dublin.

The thanks of the Company are due are hereby to given [sic] C W Williams Esq of the City of Dublin Steam Company for his promptitude in attending to the wishes of the Company, and to James Heartley [recte Hartley] Esq for running a Car in conjunction with the Steamer and Dublin Day Coach, and his reduction of Fares on the Line, Passengers getting from Sligo to Dublin for 13s.

Your committee have to thank the Public generally for the support they have received, and they trust by the attention of their officers to serve the Public, that the Public in return will serve them, and hope at the next Annual Meeting to be able to declare a dividend of 14 per cent.

The Lady of the Lake leaves Sligo at 4 Evening, and Dromahair at ½ past 9, Morning

For Carrick and Dublin Per Steamer, Car, and Day-Coach, 13s.

The Lady of the Lake has ceased to ply on Sundays.

Company’s Office, Dromahair, 10th Oct 1844

The Champion, Sligo 12 October 1844

What shall we do with the drunken sailor?

Liverpool Police. Saturday, Feb 17 [1827]

William Brown, the Sailor:
— a romance in real life

On Saturday last, as the Commerce steam packet, belonging to the City of Dublin Company, was starting from George’s Pier Head, Batchelor, the police constable on duty, called out to the commander of the vessel to hold on for a few minutes, and instantly went on board with two of his assistants, and after a few minutes’ search they returned on shore with one of the passengers in custody, who was dressed in sailor’s clothes, and passed by the name of Wm Brown.

The case of this person’s apprehension was a report which had been communicated to the Constable that a female in a disguise, the description of which corresponded with this person’s attire, had taken a passage for Dublin by the Commerce, which awakened in his mind, not unnaturally, a suspicion that it was some woman who had either escaped from prison, or had been engaged in some robbery, and was flying to evade detection, whom it was therefore his duty to detain for examination before a Magistrate. The dress had been so minutely described, that it was impossible to mistake the person, notwithstanding the addition of a still deeper disguise of intoxication, in which the party was found at the time of making the capture.

When safely lodged in Bridewell and about to undergo a personal examination by Mrs Clayton, the wife of the keeper, finding detection inevitable, the prisoner confessed the fact of her sex and disguise.

In the evening, when perfectly sobered, she stated her name to be Selina Augusta Hamilton. Inquiries which had been made in the interim led to the discovery of the house in which she had been lodging by the Old Dock, and one of the constables was engaged, in the course of the evening, in conversation with the landlady for the purpose of tracing her history, when a respectably dressed man entered the room, to whom the landlady pointed and said “here’s the very gentleman as can tell you all about her”. The gentleman in question proved to be the master of the brig Laura, of New York, lying in Prince’s Dock, whose name we have been told is Duffey.

From the account given by this person, who, we believe, was the cause of her detention, as well as from her own statement, the following particulars of this extraordinary being have been collected.

Her father is said to be a merchant in London, and owner, wholly or in part, of several vessels, one of which was stated to be now lying in George’s Dock. He was said, as we understood it, to have a counting-house at Topham’s (query Topping’s?) Wharf, and a dwelling-house at Shadwell. From his house, it appears that she absconded about three years ago, to follow a young man with whom she had fallen in love. He was the mate of a vessel in the North American trade; and hearing that he had sailed for St John’s, New Brunswick, she came down to Liverpool, and took her passage in a  vessel bound to that place. This part of her story is confirmed by several persons in this town, who recollect having seen her at that period, when they describe her to have been a young lady of fashionable appearance, elegantly dressed, and ladylike in her deportment.

On her arrival at St John’s, she found that the vessel to which her lover belonged had gone to Quebec; thither she therefore followed him, and there she learned that he had been drowned in the passage up the river St Lawrence.

Her determination was immediately taken to become a sailor for his sake, and, doffing her woman’s gear, of which she found means to dispose, and submitting the luxuriant tresses of her flaxen hair to the sheers, in the attire befitting a youth of the station which she assumed, she engaged herself as cook and steward to the master of a vessel bound for London, with whom she remained upwards of twelve months. While the vessel lay in the Thames, she met her father one day in the street, and touched her hat to him as she passed, but so completely was she altered as to defy recognition. In that vessel she served upwards of twelve months, and would still have continued in her, but that the Master, suspecting her secret, at length succeeded in extorting from her an acknowledgement of the truth, and afterwards wished her to remain with him, upon terms to which she would not submit.

Her assumption of the habits of a sailor, it seems, has by no means been limited to the “jacket and trowsers blue”, but the grog and the “backee”, and “the pretty girls to boot”, have all contributed their share towards the completion of the matamorphosis [sic]. Of the grog there was abundant evidence in her condition at the time of her being apprehended; of the tobacco, a token appeared in a well-filled box in her jacket pocket; and for the girls, she has unquestionably been humming them with a few adventures a la Paddingtoni. To one young woman she performed the honours of a regular courtship, underwent the threefold publication of the banns of marriage, and was only prevented from undergoing the ceremony itself, by a timely discovery of the parish officers, that the bride elect was in a condition very shortly to become a mother, when the creature was upon the point of declaring our heroine to be the father of her expected offspring; and then, says the latter, “you know I could not go any further”, and therefore the connection ended.

Since her arrival in Liverpool she has bamboozled more than one of the frail portion of its female inhabitants by affecting a serious attachment; and one night partaking too deeply of the potations to which she invited one of the beauties of Bridge-street, whom she had treated “to the play”, she was robbed by her of the greater part of her earnings by her last voyage.

The discovery of her sex on that occasion secured impunity to the plunderer, who afterwards buzzed it about; and to escape from the disagreeable consequences which the adventure had entailed upon her, she determined to go to Ireland in hopes of being able there to embark in one of the first vessels for British America, that being the trade to which she has attached herself in memory of her lover, William Brown, whose name she had assumed. She has stated since she has been in custody that she will have a fortune of £4000 at her own disposal when she comes of age — she is now not quite nineteen — and that she intends to lay it out in the purchase and equipment of a vessel, of which she expects by that time to have qualified herself to take the command.

She is in person of the ordinary stature of women, but rather stoutly made, and inclining to embonpoint; of fair complexion, with light hair and grey eyes, round face, features by no means handsome, though not unpleasing for a boy.

Yesterday, she was brought up for examination at the Town-hall, before Mr Alderman Peter Bourne, to whom a brief outline of her history had been sketched, the Mr Duffey, of the brig Laura, before named, appearing to state the grounds of her detention, in which, we must say, that for some reason or other, he cut as foolish a figure as any man could desire to do.

Before the lady made her appearance, Mr Duffey stated to the Magistrate that he had become acquainted with the prisoner from seeing her several times in her walk, near her father’s residence, but that he had no acquaintance with her father, whom, however, he knew to be a man of considerable property, as described above.

The prisoner, on being questioned by the Magistrate, said she knew that gentleman (Mr Duffey) very well, having often seen him at her father’s house.

The Magistrate then asked Mr Duffey if he had any thing to say against her; to which he replied, that he wished her to be given into his charge, that he might restore her to her father.

A look of something like surprise was the only comment of the girl upon this application; and the answer was, that he had no authority to give her into his charge. He, however, advised the girl to give up her present mode of life and return to her father.

She said she had made her own choice of her present mode of life, and she did not know why any one should wish to make her leave it. The Magistrate said he had no authority to prevent her from following her inclination, nor to detain her. She was therefore discharged.

Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier 22 February 1827

Crinoline had its full sway

King’s County (from our correspondent)

Pic-nic on the River Shannon

One of the most delightful re-unions of the gentry of this and the adjoining counties that has taken place for many years came off on Tuesday last. The Dublin Steampacket Company kindly placed one of their steamers (the Lady Lansdowne) at the disposal of their respected agent, T F Fleetwood Esq, Banagher.

At an early hour Banagher presented a stirring scene. Carriages and other vehicles arrived in rapid succession with their precious cargoes at the quay, where awaited their arrival this handsome vessel, gaily decorated for the occasion. Here ensued a gay and bustling scene — ladies occupying no small space, gentlemen running to and fro, seeing to the comfort of their charges, while carts laden with all the delicacies of the season were being delivered.

At ten o’clock the signal was given by the captain — steam up, and this joyous company took their departure for Killaloe, the amateur band on board striking up one of its best amidst the plaudits of numerous spectators who had assembled on the quay.

Two o’clock arrived, and with it came the gallant ship to the beach at Killaloe, where the Picnicians landed and repaired to the beautiful grounds and gardens attached to the Palace, where the show and splendour of the flowers can scarcely be surpassed. In this delightful promenade two hours passed as a fleeting minute, when all were summoned once more to meet, as it were, on a marine parade — and, indeed, a happy mustering it was — “roll called”, and nearly one hundred and fifty being present.

Here a knife and fork exercise was created in which all bore a ready and willing part. This being terminated and the deck cleared dancing commenced, and was kept up with great spirit for some time, when tea was announced, and when over dancing was again resumed and enjoyed until ten o’clock, when the handsome bridge at Banagher told that the day was spent; and the spirits of all seemed to sink when the vessel touched the wharf where to land them for their homes. Never was there a more joyous and happy day spent on the waters of the noble Shannon

Spreading forth like the sea

nor its delightful scenery more fully appreciated. All was harmony and good humour — nothing occurred to mar the happiness of the meeting, and everything was so admirably arranged, owing to the indefatigable exertions of Mr and Mrs Fleetwood, combined with the polite attention of the commander of the ship — in fact everything required was to be had in a moment, and no crowding or confusion of any kind, although crinoline had its full sway.

Amongst the company were the following: The High Sheriff, Mrs and the Misses Seymour, Ballymore Castle; Mr James Drought (late High Sheriff) and Mrs Drought; the Misses Eyre, the Castle; The Eyres, Hassop Park; Mrs and Miss Graves, Cloghan Castle; Mr John P Armstrong and Mrs Armstrong, Mr W B Armstrong, Mrs and the Misses Armstrong; Mr and Mrs Rolleston, Miss Rolleston and the Misses Woods; Mr, Mrs and Miss Hill; Colonel, Mrs and Miss Manners, and Miss Sandes; Mrs, the Misses and Mr M’Causland; Captain and the Misses Gascoine, Colonel Eyre, Mr Stradford Eyre, Mr Usher, Messrs and Miss Seymour, Mr John H Moore and family, Mrs Bird and party, Mr and Mrs Owen, and the Misses Horsman; Mr, Mrs and Miss Fleeetwood; Messrs Robinson and Miss Robinson, Mr and Miss Purefoy, Dr Tarleton, Mrs Montgomery and Miss Blake, Rev Mr and Mrs Stavely, the Misses Wetherell; Rev Mr, Mrs and Miss Bell, Miss Good, Dr Barry; Messrs Warren, Stack, Tabiteau &c &c.

Saunders’s News-Letter 8 July 1859

Killaloe/Ballina talk on steamers

Wednesday 28 February 2018, Wood & Bell café, Killaloe, 7.00pm; details here.

Killaloe Bridge

A new bridge for Killaloe:

We may here state that in the projected improvements of the Shannon, the rapids will be lowered, a new bridge erected, and the navigation of the river between Killaloe and Limerick materially altered.

James Fraser, Landscape Gardener and Designer of Rural Improvements A Hand Book for Travellers in Ireland, descriptive of its scenery, towns, seats, antiquities, etc with various statistical tables. Also an outline of its mineral structure, a brief view of its botany, and information for anglers William Curry, Jun and Company, Dublin; Longman and Company, London; Fraser and Co, Edinburgh 1844

It took a while, but the new bridge seems to be on its way. The old bridge — which has been altered in many ways over the years — has done enough and deserves to be relieved of the volume of traffic crossing it daily.

Anyone intending to create any further delays to the bypass should be invited to go and boil his or her head.