Category Archives: Historical matters

Monivea

In my page about the Monivea navigations I wrote that I would be glad to hear from anyone who can provide more information about them, past or present.

Marian Hardiman has very kindly put up photos of the flax mill and a windmill near Monivea on Facebook.

She also drew my attention to the excellent site of Skehana & District Heritage, which is packed with interesting articles. A search said that there were 158 on Monivea alone.

 

Killaloe

There is a new video about Killaloe’s waterside heritage on the Heritage Week website here. The video was made in July 2020 by Joe O Dughghaill of Pine Valley Productions, Killaloe.

Before there was Effin

The name Effin Bridge has been given, in jest, to the lifting railway-bridge that crosses the Royal Canal just below Newcomen Bridge in Dublin. Here is an article about the bridges that preceded Effin Bridge at that site.

Around the Blackwater

That’s the Munster Blackwater. For some time I have had a page about it here, based on a boat trip from Youghal to (and a little beyond) Cappoquin and on road trips to the Bride and the Lismore Canal.

I thought it would be useful to visit the Blackwater by road, driving around the lower portion from Cappoquin to the Youghal Bridge and back again to visit the various quays and to see what could be seen from the land rather than the water.

I have put up a page here; it has links to individual pages on the places we visited (with photos). You can move from place to place on that page or follow the links on the bottoms of the individual pages to follow a clockwise route around the lower Blackwater from Cappoquin to the Youghal Bridge on the east side and back up on the west side.

Dutch sailing fleet

Covid-19 has damaged the financial basis for the survival of historic Dutch sailing vessels.

The Hind before

A new piece by The Antiquarian about very early works on the River Hind.

As well as the link here, I have put a permanent link from my own page on the Hind.

Broadstone addition

Thanks to Pat Conneely for this photo of the Broadstone station and the Royal Canal. I’ve added it to my page on the Broadstone Line of the Royal Canal.

The Broadstone station before the canal harbour was filled in (photo courtesy Pat Conneely)

The photo must have been taken before 1877, when the harbour was filled in.

 

 

 

 

The Munster Blackwater

I am in the process of adding some pages with photos of the Munster Blackwater. These are photos of the water from the land, whereas my existing page shows the land from the water. While I’m working on this, incomplete pages may appear hither and yon; ignore them and wait for the announcement of the completed work.

Longships

The early impact of the steamship was greatest within the technological and economic heartlands of Europe and North America. Glasgow saw one service every ten minutes in the 1830s, while a regular service between Vienna and Budapest, inaugurated in 1826 and taken over in 1829 by the famous Donaudampfschifffahrtsgesellschaft (one of the longest words in the German language), had a fleet of seventy-one ships by 1850 for a trip lasting roughly fourteen hours.

Jürgen Osterhammel The Transformation of the World: a global history of the nineteenth century Princeton University Press 2009, English translation by Patrick Camiller 2014

According to Wikipedia,

Since the German spelling reform of 1996, “Schifffahrt” is written with three “f”s; however, since the name belongs to a company that existed before the spelling reform, the old form of the name is used when referring to the company.

The name of the company is well known in German-speaking countries as a starter to humorously construct even longer compound words. Donau­dampf­schiffahrts­gesellschafts­kapitäns­mütze is such a word, which potentially might even have been used, but probably never actually was. It means a “DDSG captain’s hat”. Another common example is Donau­dampf­schiffahrts­gesellschafts­kapitäns­kajüten­schlüssel which means “DDSG captain’s cabin key”.

Happily, abbreviations have now been invented.

 

Sligo Ship Canal

Good article here.