Category Archives: Engineering and construction

From Hull, Hell and Halifax good Lord deliver us

Actually, the original version seems to be

From Hull, from Halifax, from hell, ’tis thus,
From all these three, good Lord deliver us.

That’s from “A Merry-Wherry-Ferry Voyage” by John Taylor, the Water Poet, in 1622, collected in Early Prose and Poetical Works of John Taylor, The Water Poet (1580–1653) Hamilton, Adams & Co, London 1888.

I’ve been to (a few bits of) Halifax. The Piece Hall is stunning and the Calderdale Industrial Museum [Saturdays, 10.00am to 4.00pm] has not only a wonderful collection of machines but also a wonderful collection of knowledgeable volunteers who can tell you all about them: well worth a visit if you have any interest in industrial history, but allow plenty of time.

So that’s Halifax, and now I find [thanks to Caught by the River] that Hull is full of interesting stuff too, at least on the Open Bridges website, with lots of stuff about the river and barges.

So there is much to be said for visiting Hull and Halifax.

I wouldn’t bother about Hell, though: it’s full of Brexiteers, all thinking up magical solutions for getting out.

 

Shave and a haircut

Scarriff Harbour after a haircut

Looking downriver

I hope that the same is being done on the Shannon—Erne Waterway.

Newry: canal, steam railways, ships …

Thanks to Andrew Waldron for the link to this film, The Clanrye Connection, about Newry and its transport systems: the inland canal, the ship canal and the railways. The film was made by the BBC in 1996 and is about 50 minutes long.

There is even an electric tram.

 

Problems on the Rhine

No, not the one in Co Clare.

No German officers

Quicksilver

Rev Mr Magawly [MacGauley], a R C Clergyman, is engaged by the Canal Company in the construction of a boat, to be propelled by quick silver, and which is expected to go 20 miles an hour!

Limerick Chronicle 5 September 1838

The Four Pots tramway

Ewan Duffy has an interesting post here about a tramway from a quarry to the bank of the Grand Canal beside the Four Pots.

 

They killed Kenny!

Annabeg, Annaghbeg, Plassy or Plassey Lock on the Limerick Navigation (OSI 6″ ~1840)

 

Last Sunday a young man of the name of Kenny, bathing in one of the locks of the Canal, near Annabeg, was unfortunately drowned; the sluices of the gates happened to be open, through which the poor lad was drawn from the great suction, and his head very much shattered.

Saunders’s News-Letter 30 July 1803

The ghost of William Ockenden

I see that Ramsgate is back in the news.

Talbot’s Canal, Malahide

Hat-tip to Carthach Ó Maonaigh for pointing me to this article about a [proposed?] canal I had not heard of before: Richard Talbot’s Canal in Malahide. Talbot intended to build a canal to carry heavy goods inland from Malahide harbour via Swords to join the Broadmeadow River at Fieldstown.

This is yet another example of [proposed] eighteenth century investment and improvement by estate owners. Most of the canals I’ve covered were inland, and often associated with bogs for reclamation and turf extraction; this one shows that improvers could have other aims in mind.

Incidentally, the articles on the Old Yellow Walls site seem to be carefully researched and referenced.

 

Garryowen and the Royal Canal

The shortage of water for the Royal Canal has been covered a few times on these pages with pieces about its feeders in general, the Lough Owel feeder in particular and the proposed replacement supply from Lough Ennell.  Last I heard, the Lough Ennell proposal had become a matter for Irish Water rather than for the local authority, which sent the whole thing back to the drawing-board but if, Gentle Reader, you have more recent information, do please leave a Comment below.

A recent post about the inadequacy of back-pumping from the Inny led to a discussion in the Comments, from which it became plain that the Lough Owel feeder was well below normal levels and that the water supply to Mullingar, never mind that to the canal, was seriously inadequate. I was prompted to suggest that one of these might be the best type of boat for the Royal.

But I see from the blatts that the seventh cavalry, in the shape of Irish Water (whistling Garryowen, of course), intends to take water from Lough Ree to supply Athlone, Mullingar and Moate.

Perhaps there will be some to spare for the Royal Canal.