The storm on the Shannon

Turf boat above Killaloe: Admiralty Surveyors' sketch 1839 [by kind permission of the UK National Archives]

Turf boat above Killaloe: Admiralty Surveyors’ sketch 1839 [by kind permission of the UK National Archives]

On Tuesday last, a boat laden with turf, and manned by three persons — two Quins, brothers, young boys, and the owner, Martin Houlagan — left the County of Galway side of the Shannon for Killaloe. The weather became so very rough, it was late before they neared the quay at Derry Castle; but, unfortunately, when within view of safety, a squall split the sail, and the little vessel capsized, and, with the two Quins, sank to the bottom.

Houlagan swam to the shore, but it was so dark he could not find his way; he got inside a sheltered ditch from the inclemency of the night, but was found, in the morning, a lifeless corpse.

Northern Whig 26 November 1840 quoting the Nenagh Guardian

Boat Trade on the Barrow

BOAT TRADE

Dublin to and from Waterford
CALLING AT ROSS AND GRAIGUE

The Public are respectfully informed that the Boats of the BARROW NAVIGATION COMPANY call regularly each week to and from the above-mentioned Towns, say on the Mornings of MONDAY and THURSDAY, at Three o’Clock, making TWO deliveries weekly at each end.

The Company having selected Men of the besst characters as Masters of their Boats, they engage the safe delivery of all Goods forwarded, and hope by moderate charges and dispatch to give satisfaction.

GOODS FOR ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND to be forwarded by these Boats, should be directed to the Agents of the Company.

Goods can be forwarded by careful carriers to the following towns, viz:

FROM FROM FROM Waterford
Graigue To
To Ross Carrick-on-Suir
Borris Clonmel
Innistiogue To Dungarvan
Thomastown Dunmore
Enniscorthy Ballyhack
Wexford Tramore

For further particulars, apply to the Company’s Agents

Mr JOHN KELLY, Grand Canal Harbour, Dublin

Mr JOHN M’DONNELL, Custom-House Quay and Lower Thomas-street, Waterford

Mr M W CARR, New Ross

Mr M RYAN, Graigue

Or to the Secretary of the Company, P D LaTOUCHE, Esq, Castle-street, Dublin

Waterford Chronicle 4 November 1854

Plassey in 1851

Plassey August 2010 37_resize

Free the Black Bridge

Here is a page about a cot race at Plassey in 1851.

 

 

John Weaving in American hospital

Dr Jim Stageman has made a painting from a photo of John Weaving on a whiteboard in an American hospital. Click here; you’ll probably have to work through the gallery of thumbnails [there are seven] below the main picture to get to JW.

Younger folk may wish to know that the photo was also the basis of a painting used in a film.

Work in a box in the docks

Waterways Ireland wants a manager (one-year contract) for its visitor centre in Dublin, aka the Box in the Docks.

The Holy Island ferry

After opening Lough Derg, we passed by Holy Island, with its ruins and round tower looming in the distance. The island contains about twenty acres, and so valuable are the feed derivable from the host of penitents who repair to do their stations on the Holy Isle, that the ferry, between it and the main, is rented for a considerable annual sum.

JK [Sir James Emerson Tennent Bart]Letters to the North, from a Traveller in the South Hodgson, Belfast; Milliken and Son, Dublin 1837

Killaloe baby

On Thursday evening, the body of a fine female child was found sewed up in a bag on the banks of the canal near Killaloe. A man was taken up on suspicion of being the murderer, but was subsequently liberated. A verdict of murder against some person or persons unknown was returned at the inquest which was held.

Limerick and Clare Examiner 10 November 1847

Tullamore drowning

A respectable boat owner, named Stapleton, when passing through Tullamore, on Saturday morning, and while putting his boat through lock No 27, lost his balance and was precipitated into the chamber, the water in which was then so low as to prevent those on the bank from rendering immediate assistance; he was sucked through one of the sluice gates, and completely removed from human exertion. His body was ultimately got out of the water, and medical assistance promptly, but fruitlessly, afforded.

Statesman and Dublin Christian Record 5 June 1846 quoting the King’s County Chronicle

Overloaded boat

A Railway Wanted. — On Thursday week the fly-boat on the Grand Canal was so crowded with passengers returning from Ballinasloe fair, that between Tullamore and Philipstown they sat nearly up to their knees in water. Not liking the comfort afforded by such a mode of conveyance, many of the passengers left at the latter place and took cars, and the boat proceeded to Dublin without accident.

London Standard 28 October 1845 quoting the Longford Journal

ESB Erne elvers

Northern Ireland Assembly question here.