Category Archives: Shannon

Limerick Navigation lockkeepers

The Limerick Navigation was in five sections — three canals with river sections in between — and joined Limerick to Killaloe and the rest of the inland Shannon. The canal sections had locks, each controlled by a lockkeeper who lived on site. The job passed from generation to generation: some of the lockkeepers’ cottages are still inhabited by descendants of the lockkeepers.

Cussane lock (OSI 25″ ~1900)

Cussane was the furthest downstream of the three locks on the Killaloe section of the canal. It was covered by water when the Ardnacrusha hydroelectric scheme created the “flooded area” below Killaloe. If memory serves, Cussane was known as Crowe’s Lock.

In the online searchable catalogue of the Registered Papers of the Chief Secretary’s Office in the National Archives, there is a letter dated 15 February 1830 [CSO/RP/1830/815]

[…] from James Saurin, Henry R Paine, and John Radcliffe, [Directors General of Inland Navigation], Board of Control, [Dublin], to Hugh Percy, 3rd Duke Northumberland, [Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Dublin], recommending Denis Crow to succeed Lott Corboy sheriff as lockkeeper on the Limerick Navigation.]

There is also a letter dated 2 June 1830 [CSO/RP/1830/836]

from James Saurin, J Armit, and Henry R Paine, [Directors General of Inland Navigation], Navigation Office, [Dublin], to Hugh Percy, 3rd Duke Northumberland, [Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Dublin], recommending dismissal of Simon Johnston, lockkeeper on the Limerick Navigation, for irregularities and for deception; asking to employ Michael Gully in his stead, for Stg£9-4-9 per annum.

Gully’s Lock is at Gillogue, on the central canal section known as the Plassey–Errina Canal.

Gillogue lock (OSI 25″ ~1900)

 

 

 

Waterways update: work in progress (1759)

Here is some information about the work of Messrs Ockenden and Omer on Irish waterways up to 1759. It is extracted from a book by Henry Brooke; Ockenden had, twenty years earlier, subscribed to support Brooke’s play. It is not impossible that they were acquainted, in Ireland or in England. Apart from anything else, both were supporters of Frederick, Prince of Wales: see A N Newman “The Political Patronage of Frederick Lewis, Prince of Wales” in The Historical Journal Vol 1 No 1 1958 on Ockenden’s post in the prince’s household at £100 a year and here on Frederick’s “many attentions” to Brooke.

Brooke’s account contains some information about Ockenden’s work that I have not seen elsewhere. I found the reference to Brooke in Thomas McIlvenna This Wonder-Working Canal: a history of the Tyrone Navigation Coalisland Canal Branch IWAI 2005.

Who was William Ockenden?

William Ockenden has been described as a Dutch engineer who worked on three eighteenth century Irish navigations: the Mallow to Lombardstown canal, the Kilkenny/Nore navigation and the Limerick Navigation [Park Canal section], all of them notably unsuccessful.

It seems likely that he was English, not Dutch, but may have lived in Ireland before inheriting property in England. But was he an engineer or a mill-owner and MP? Were there one or two William Ockendens at the time?

Here is some information and some speculation. I would welcome more of the first.

Floating remains

The Limerick Advertiser states, that whilst a funeral was lately passing from the shore to a small island [presumably Inis Cealtra, Holy Island] in the great Lough above Killaloe, the friends and relatives of the deceased having thought the ice sufficiently strong to carry the corpse across, it unfortunately broke, and the remains of the deceased were precipitated into the water, and a number of people, who were conveying the corpse, fell in and perished.

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette
3 February 1820

Dromineer

Not that many pubs, surely.

Ireland’s mystical waterway

Mystical logo

Perhaps you’ve noticed an outbreak of strange stickers on Shannon hireboats, proclaiming that the river is “Ireland’s mystical waterway”. Cynics will dismiss this as just more marketing bollocks, in this case associated with the claim that the Shannon, which is in the middle of Ireland, is part of something called “Ireland’s Ancient East“. I do wish that, when marketing dudes get these brainwaves, they’d keep them to themselves.

But wait! What if we’re all wrong? What if the Shannon really is a mystical waterway? After all, wasn’t there recently a miracle in Athlone?

Mind you, you may need an encounter with spirits yourself after reading that lot: the spirits that come in 70cl bottles.

 

The Lough Gill Steam Company

Annual report of the Lough Gill Steam Company

Rev Thomas M’Keon, in the Chair

According to the Deed of Settlement, the Accounts are now laid before the Shareholders, and your Committee have the pleasure of recommending a dividend of 7 per Cent, still leaving a balance on hands as a surplus fund. This being her maiden year, during the first six months very few people travelled by the Steam Boat, the people being deterred by superstitious stories; but your Committee are enabled to state, that for the last six months, the passenger traffic has increased 350 per cent, with a prospect of a still further increase.

Lough Gill (OSI 25″)

Most of the passengers come from Drumkeerin, Doury, Dabally, and the country beyond the River Shannon, who are enabled by this conveyance to go to the Sligo Market, and return home the same day, thus travelling upwards of 50 Irish miles. From Manorhamilton and Glenfarn few passengers have as yet come, but it is hoped they will find this the best, cheapest, and quickest route, the fares for nine Irish miles being only 6d in cabin, and 3d on deck. If the contemplated road to Glenfarn by Gurtermore was opened, a passenger trade from Enniskillen (in 4½ hours from Sligo), Blacklion, Glenfarn, almost equal to her present trade, might be fairly expected. The Committee recommend all means to be used to get this road, about 3½ miles long, to be opened.

The number of passengers for six months ending October were:

Cabin 3240        Deck 12932

Your Committee would advise a system of Tickets for Passengers. The improvements of the Shannon are rapidly progressing, and when finished (in about 2 years) will, in conjunction with the Athlone Railway, open an immense passenger traffic on this line, the City of Dublin Company having offered to run powerful Steamers in conjunction with this Company to the Railway, bringing all the passengers between Sligo and Dublin.

The thanks of the Company are due are hereby to given [sic] C W Williams Esq of the City of Dublin Steam Company for his promptitude in attending to the wishes of the Company, and to James Heartley [recte Hartley] Esq for running a Car in conjunction with the Steamer and Dublin Day Coach, and his reduction of Fares on the Line, Passengers getting from Sligo to Dublin for 13s.

Your committee have to thank the Public generally for the support they have received, and they trust by the attention of their officers to serve the Public, that the Public in return will serve them, and hope at the next Annual Meeting to be able to declare a dividend of 14 per cent.

The Lady of the Lake leaves Sligo at 4 Evening, and Dromahair at ½ past 9, Morning

For Carrick and Dublin Per Steamer, Car, and Day-Coach, 13s.

The Lady of the Lake has ceased to ply on Sundays.

Company’s Office, Dromahair, 10th Oct 1844

The Champion, Sligo 12 October 1844

The mysterious capitalist

In 1847 George Lewis Smyth wrote [in Ireland: Historical and Statistical Vol II Whittaker and Co, London 1847 Chapter 14]

Another favourite object of praise and assistance is the Dublin and Kingstown Railway. The large sums lent to this railway and to the Ulster Canal are represented in certain circles in Dublin to have been matters of personal obligation. A capitalist holding a considerable interest in both undertakings is familiarly described as always carrying a commissioner in his breeches pocket.

Who was the capitalist in question? One possibility is Peirce [or Pierce] Mahony, solicitor to both the Dublin and Kingstown Railway and the Ulster Canal Company, but perhaps “capitalist” in not quite the mot juste for him. Another is James Perry, quondam director of the railway and Managing Director of the Ulster Canal Steam Carrying Company, which was owned (from 1843) by William Dargan, the contractor who built the Dublin and Kingstown Railway.

Perry had fingers in many other pies, including the Ringsend Iron Works which, in 1842, built an iron steamer for the use of the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company on the Shannon. The steamer was named the Lady Burgoyne.

 

The speed limit in Athlone

The following photographs (and many others) were taken from the Watergate in Athlone on Sunday 5 August 2018. An IWAI Rally was in progress and the Lough Ree Yacht Club’s annual regatta was beginning, but there is of course no suggestion that the boats and boaters shown in these photos had any connection with either of those august institutions.

No doubt it is difficult to estimate speed

I do not know what is happening here

The jetski was relatively harmless

A large BRIG RIB, I think

Madarua goes upstream

Madarua goes downstream

Madarua alongside a cruiser

Madarua upstream again

Madarua upstream again

A busy boater: up …

… still going up …

Down

Up again

Down again

A red RIB

This one is almost sedate

Spotting the photographer

Three RIBs coming downstream (the nearest is not one of the three)

Three RIBs travelling more slowly below the railway bridge

The Watergate

There is, I believe, a 5 km/h [~2.7 knots] speed limit for boats passing through Athlone. The area covered includes the river at the Watergate and upstream for some distance above the railway bridge.

Tom Nolan, Grand Canal Company boatman

At its August meeting, the Killaloe–Ballina Local History Society presented “a selection of oral history recordings taken over 25 years ago of some of Killaloe’s and Ballina’s most elderly residents”; you can read about the event here.

Most of the recordings were made in 1992. One was an interview with Tom Nolan, formerly of the Grand Canal Company, and you can read a transcription of the interview here.