Category Archives: Foreign parts

A lake museum?

Nah, it’d never work.

Header photo?

I’ve been asked what it is. Its principal claim to fame is that it is not Holyhead.

Which is just as well. You can’t drive there, unless you’re a resident: you have to walk, which will give you an appetite for a pint or two in Ty Coch.

But the inability to drive there would have made it difficult to operate car ferries.

Bleedin Brexit

What he says.

Limerick and Newport

Newport in South Wales, that is. If you’ve taken a ferry from Rosslare Harbour to Fishguard or Pembroke, and you’re driving across South Wales, you might like to stop at Newport. It’s got a transporter bridge, and not a lot of places can say that.

It also has the Cefn Flight of Fourteen Locks, which raises an interesting question about the Limerick Navigation.

From Hull, Hell and Halifax good Lord deliver us

Actually, the original version seems to be

From Hull, from Halifax, from hell, ’tis thus,
From all these three, good Lord deliver us.

That’s from “A Merry-Wherry-Ferry Voyage” by John Taylor, the Water Poet, in 1622, collected in Early Prose and Poetical Works of John Taylor, The Water Poet (1580–1653) Hamilton, Adams & Co, London 1888.

I’ve been to (a few bits of) Halifax. The Piece Hall is stunning and the Calderdale Industrial Museum [Saturdays, 10.00am to 4.00pm] has not only a wonderful collection of machines but also a wonderful collection of knowledgeable volunteers who can tell you all about them: well worth a visit if you have any interest in industrial history, but allow plenty of time.

So that’s Halifax, and now I find [thanks to Caught by the River] that Hull is full of interesting stuff too, at least on the Open Bridges website, with lots of stuff about the river and barges.

So there is much to be said for visiting Hull and Halifax.

I wouldn’t bother about Hell, though: it’s full of Brexiteers, all thinking up magical solutions for getting out.

 

Newry: canal, steam railways, ships …

Thanks to Andrew Waldron for the link to this film, The Clanrye Connection, about Newry and its transport systems: the inland canal, the ship canal and the railways. The film was made by the BBC in 1996 and is about 50 minutes long.

There is even an electric tram.

 

Brexit and borders

I see that Her unfortunate Majesty’s Government has been testing the technology for the enforcement of a hard border in the Irish Sea.

Problems on the Rhine

No, not the one in Co Clare.

No German officers

Brexit loonies

It is hard to understand how people can be so short-sighted and indeed nitwitted as to vote to leave a larger political and economic union, without the slightest idea of what was to happen afterwards. Or how politicians, with a hugely inflated view of their own country’s importance, can ignore economic and commercial practicalities in favour of an entirely unrealistic notion of sovereignty. No thought for how existing commercial relationships would be affected or how that would affect trade and employment. A ridiculous assumption that politicians and civil servants could set up new trade deals and would be better at it than those with practical experience.

That, however, is exactly what Sinn Féin did in 1918 and 1919, in its election manifesto and in the unicorn-bedecked “democratic programme” adopted by the first Dáil.

I say this not to excuse HM Brexiteers — I think that both they and Sinn Féin (past and present) are bonkers — but to suggest that outbreaks of mass insanity can happen to anyone.

The ghost of William Ockenden

I see that Ramsgate is back in the news.