Category Archives: Extant waterways

Yorkshire wins [again]

Our Yorkshire correspondent reports that the garden we mentioned here has won a gold medal at the Chelsea flower show. The garden shows a lock, 20E, on the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, which has so many locks that those on the east side of the Pennines have an E suffix and those on the west a W. Real lock gates were used.

Egypt and Ireland

We embarked [on the Mahmoudié Canal at Alexandria] in a boat not unlike those that ply in Ireland upon the Grand Canal and, to say the truth, among the dreary wastes of swamp that surrounded us, we might also have fancied ourselves in the midst of the Bog of Allen.

The boat was towed by four wild, scraggy-looking horses, ridden by four wilder, scraggier-looking men; their naked feet were stuck in shovel stirrups, with the sharp sides of which they scored their horses flanks, after the fashion of crimped cod.

It is true, these jockeys wore tattered turbans instead of tattered hats, and loose blue gowns instead of grey frieze. Yet still there was nothing very new or imposing in the equipage, and the mud cabins that here and there encrusted the banks did not tend to obliterate Tipperary associations.

Eliot Warburton The Crescent and the Cross; or, romance and realities of eastern travel new ed, George P Putnam, New York 1848

There will be more on links between the Shannon and the Nile, Ireland and Egypt, at the Mountshannon Arts Festival on Saturday 1 June 2019 at 3.00pm, aboard one of the boats that used to “ply in Ireland upon the Grand Canal”.

The latest header

The Pierhead in Liverpool (not to be confused with the Pierhead in Killaloe), seen from the Ferry ‘cross the Mersey. I recommend the round trip.  And they don’t play the entire song.

Big it up for West Yorkshire

It’s all go in West Yorkshire. I think of Yorkshire as the British equivalent of County Cork: it knows it’s the biggest county and the real capital and is quietly confident of its own superiority. So Yorkshire folk won’t have been in the least surprised to find that HM the Q has appointed a West Yorkshire man, Simon Armitage, as her Poet Laureate: only right and proper, they’ll think to themselves.

But he’s not just from Yorkshire, not just from West Yorkshire: he’s from Marsden, on the Huddersfield Narrow Canal. And the HNC between Marsden and Huddersfield has inspired a garden at this year’s Chelsea Flower Show, which will use two pairs of gates from the HNC.

Huddersfield has many claims to fame: the railway station, the statue of Harold Wilson and, of course, the Magic Rock brewery, to name but three. I do hope the poor benighted folk of Chelsea will appreciate what they’re getting.

[h/t The Gaffer]

Transports of delight

I have mentioned the Newport transporter bridge, but today Jonathan Calder provides a film about the larger [Widnes to] Runcorn transporter. There are barges and cars and all sorts.

It always strikes me as odd that Liverpool has no bridges and that you have to go miles upstream to Runcorn to cross (if you want to be above water and not on a ferry, although the ferry trip is a wondrous thing in itself).

Of course Runcorn itself didn’t always have a bridge. Before that you had to cross by ferry, per tuppence per person per trip.

Another Kerry canal

A short piece about the canal at Ross on one of the lakes of Killarney. I have little information about its origins and current use and would welcome more.

Canal views and house prices

A view of a canal is worth money.

h/t the ever-reliable Jonathan Calder

Grand Canal carrying 1816

GRAND CANAL

Reduction of Freights etc

B Hyland and Sons return their most grateful Thanks to their Friends and the Public, for the very flattering Encouragement they have received since their commencement in Business, above 20 years, and hope, that by their constant care and attention to merit a continuance thereof. They now take the opportunity of acquainting the Friends of their Trade, that all goods committed to their care, will be forwarded as usual, with the utmost expedition. Three of their Boats leave Dublin every week, for the conveyance of all kinds of Building Materials; Wines, Spirits, Porter, Tea, Sugar, Cotton Goods, and all kinds of Merchandize &c, at tge following reduced Prices, viz:

Dublin to Rathangan                                        8s 10d per Ton
Do. to Monastereven                                      10s    6d do.
Do. to Vicarstown                                            12s    4d do.
Do. to Athy                                                        14s    2d do,

They beg leave to state to their Friends and the Public that they have got each of their Boats Hatched (so that it is impossible for Goods to meet with the slightest injury) and each Hatch is properly iron barred, with cross bars of Iron, in the most secure manner, and the moment the Goods are put into each Boat, the Hatches are put on, and locked down with brass-warded Locks of the best description, and then sealed. Each of their Agents at the above-named Stages have counter keys to open the Boats to get out the necessary Goods that is for each place. They have also provided excellent Stores at each of the above Harbours, for the general accommodation of all those who are pleased to favour them with the carriage of their Goods.

They return their best thanks to the Grand Canal Company, for their having so kindly reduced their Tolls, by which means they are thus enabled to carry Goods at the above Rates, and also to carry all kinds of Goods, Flour, Meal, Malt, Corn, &c at the under-mentioned rate of Freight to Dublin, where three of their regular fast-sailing Boats arrive each week from the country.

Athy to Dublin                                                 12s   6d per Ton
Vicarstown to do.                                            11s    6d do.
Monastereven to do.                                      10s    6d do.
Rathangan to do.                                              8s  10d do.

Exclusive of the above arrangement they have also commenced plying another Boat drawn by two Horses, which Boat leaves Monastereven every Friday evening at Four o’Clock, and arrives in Dublin on the Saturday night following; this same Boat leaves Dublin every Tuesday morning at Five o’Clock, and arrives in Monastereven on the Wednesday evening following.

They hereby give notice, that any Grain or Corn that may come by their Boats, in bulk, to Dublin, will not be entitled to the above reduction of Freight; but if the Owners of such Grain or Corn, put it into Sacks, they will then be only charged at the above-mentioned Rates (so regulated and ordered by the Grand Canal Company).

They have also established Drays with Covers for the accommodation of their Customers in Dublin, and also in the Country, for the purpose of delivering all kinds of Goods that may be conveyed by their Boats to their respective Owners.

Samples are taken from all Wines and Spirits sent to their care, the instant they are laid down off the cars, in the presence of the Carrier, in small Vial Bottles, sealed, one of which is sent to the Owners, the other retained as a proof; and they are in all cases accountable.

Their Boat Agents are Mr Henry Farrell, at Rathangan; Mr John Coyle, at Monastereven; Mr Thomas Doyle, at Vicarstown; and Mr Michael Commins, at Athy; each of whom are purchasers of Grain, and will give the full value for Wheat, Bere, Barley, Oats and Rapeseed.

Wanted, 800 new Hemp Sacks of the best Irish Manufacture; each Sack must weigh 7 lb exactly standing beam.

They have always a large supply of the best KILKENNY COALS, on reasonable Terms.

Dublin Evening Post 12 September 1816

Coal at its heels

Estimate of the annual produce of British Mines: coals

The export in 1841 was 1848294 tons; home consumption carried coastways 7649899 tons, carried inland about 19000000 tons, total 28498193 tons, free on board at 10s per ton is £14249091

This trade gives employment to 1400 vessels, 15000 Seamen and Boys, 21000 Pitmen and others employed in the collieries above ground, 2000 Keelmen, Coal-boatmen, Carters, and Trimmers, 5000 Whippers, Lightermen &c, 2500 Factors, Agetns &c in London; 45000 for the North Country Trade alone; and taking the proportion which this bears to the whole of the United Kingdom, it follows that not less than 150000 persons are engaged in the production and distribution of coal.

Statistics and Calculations essentially necessary to persons connected with Railways or Canals; containing a variety of information not to be found elsewhere. Calculated and arranged by Samuel Salt 2nd ed Effingham Wilson, London 1846

Looking after Fido

I have today sent this email to both Waterways Ireland and Clare County Council.

This email is being sent to Waterways Ireland (Scarriff office) and Clare County Council.

Let us suppose that, during the summer season (15 May to 15 September), I set  off on my boat, with my dogs, from somewhere at the northern end of Lough Derg; I moor in Mountshannon at 11.15am.

Under Clare County Council’s beach bye-laws (number 16), I may not take my dogs ashore until 6.00pm: they will be confined to Waterways Ireland’s piers and pontoons. The entire area of the car park, the access from the piers to the roads, is off limits to dogs between 11.00am and 6.00pm.

Perhaps you might, for the convenience of visiting dog-owners, designate a corridor through which dogs (on leads) might be taken to land. After all, the area in question is not actually a beach: it is a car park.