Category Archives: Irish inland waterways vessels

Hilda Ormond?

In December 2012 I published a post entitled Looking for Hilda in which I said that D B McNeill had written in his Irish Passenger Steamship Services Volume 2: South of Ireland (David & Charles, Newton Abbot 1971) that

In the autumn of 1964 the Ormonde Hotel at Nenagh took delivery of the Hilda from Holland. She is a modern canal cruising launch with central heating and a transparent roof. She is used for local trips on Lough Derg.

I said that she was described as a single-screw motor vessel with a diesel engine but that no further details are given. I sought more information about the Hilda, and hoped that a photo might be available.

Earlier today Loire commented on that post:

The MV Ormond was purchased in Amsterdam in 1964 by Denis Gilmartin, owner of the Ormond Hotel in Nenagh, Co Tipperary. Denis was accompanied on that trip to Amsterdam by local solicitor Michael O’Meara. The vessel was used to entertain guests staying at the Ormond Hotel and in promoting tourism around Lough Derg in the 1960s. Home port for MV Ormond was Garrykennedy on Lough Derg. The MV Ormond was sold to Company in Cork that deployed it for cruises on the river Lee. I have photo of the MV Ormond docked at Garrykennedy Harbour circa 1968 which I will send you.

I am very grateful for that information and for the photo, which has now arrived.

M V Ormond ~1968 (courtesy of Loire)

 

Obviously the name Ormond was bestowed when the vessel reached Lough Derg, so it is possible that it was named Hilda when in Holland.

Can anyone identify the people and dog in the photo?

 

 

This month’s header

Bartlett drawing of turf boats below Wellesley (now Sarsfield) Bridge, Limerick.

Egypt and Ireland

We embarked [on the Mahmoudié Canal at Alexandria] in a boat not unlike those that ply in Ireland upon the Grand Canal and, to say the truth, among the dreary wastes of swamp that surrounded us, we might also have fancied ourselves in the midst of the Bog of Allen.

The boat was towed by four wild, scraggy-looking horses, ridden by four wilder, scraggier-looking men; their naked feet were stuck in shovel stirrups, with the sharp sides of which they scored their horses flanks, after the fashion of crimped cod.

It is true, these jockeys wore tattered turbans instead of tattered hats, and loose blue gowns instead of grey frieze. Yet still there was nothing very new or imposing in the equipage, and the mud cabins that here and there encrusted the banks did not tend to obliterate Tipperary associations.

Eliot Warburton The Crescent and the Cross; or, romance and realities of eastern travel new ed, George P Putnam, New York 1848

There will be more on links between the Shannon and the Nile, Ireland and Egypt, at the Mountshannon Arts Festival on Saturday 1 June 2019 at 3.00pm, aboard one of the boats that used to “ply in Ireland upon the Grand Canal”.

Grand Canal carrying 1816

GRAND CANAL

Reduction of Freights etc

B Hyland and Sons return their most grateful Thanks to their Friends and the Public, for the very flattering Encouragement they have received since their commencement in Business, above 20 years, and hope, that by their constant care and attention to merit a continuance thereof. They now take the opportunity of acquainting the Friends of their Trade, that all goods committed to their care, will be forwarded as usual, with the utmost expedition. Three of their Boats leave Dublin every week, for the conveyance of all kinds of Building Materials; Wines, Spirits, Porter, Tea, Sugar, Cotton Goods, and all kinds of Merchandize &c, at tge following reduced Prices, viz:

Dublin to Rathangan                                        8s 10d per Ton
Do. to Monastereven                                      10s    6d do.
Do. to Vicarstown                                            12s    4d do.
Do. to Athy                                                        14s    2d do,

They beg leave to state to their Friends and the Public that they have got each of their Boats Hatched (so that it is impossible for Goods to meet with the slightest injury) and each Hatch is properly iron barred, with cross bars of Iron, in the most secure manner, and the moment the Goods are put into each Boat, the Hatches are put on, and locked down with brass-warded Locks of the best description, and then sealed. Each of their Agents at the above-named Stages have counter keys to open the Boats to get out the necessary Goods that is for each place. They have also provided excellent Stores at each of the above Harbours, for the general accommodation of all those who are pleased to favour them with the carriage of their Goods.

They return their best thanks to the Grand Canal Company, for their having so kindly reduced their Tolls, by which means they are thus enabled to carry Goods at the above Rates, and also to carry all kinds of Goods, Flour, Meal, Malt, Corn, &c at the under-mentioned rate of Freight to Dublin, where three of their regular fast-sailing Boats arrive each week from the country.

Athy to Dublin                                                 12s   6d per Ton
Vicarstown to do.                                            11s    6d do.
Monastereven to do.                                      10s    6d do.
Rathangan to do.                                              8s  10d do.

Exclusive of the above arrangement they have also commenced plying another Boat drawn by two Horses, which Boat leaves Monastereven every Friday evening at Four o’Clock, and arrives in Dublin on the Saturday night following; this same Boat leaves Dublin every Tuesday morning at Five o’Clock, and arrives in Monastereven on the Wednesday evening following.

They hereby give notice, that any Grain or Corn that may come by their Boats, in bulk, to Dublin, will not be entitled to the above reduction of Freight; but if the Owners of such Grain or Corn, put it into Sacks, they will then be only charged at the above-mentioned Rates (so regulated and ordered by the Grand Canal Company).

They have also established Drays with Covers for the accommodation of their Customers in Dublin, and also in the Country, for the purpose of delivering all kinds of Goods that may be conveyed by their Boats to their respective Owners.

Samples are taken from all Wines and Spirits sent to their care, the instant they are laid down off the cars, in the presence of the Carrier, in small Vial Bottles, sealed, one of which is sent to the Owners, the other retained as a proof; and they are in all cases accountable.

Their Boat Agents are Mr Henry Farrell, at Rathangan; Mr John Coyle, at Monastereven; Mr Thomas Doyle, at Vicarstown; and Mr Michael Commins, at Athy; each of whom are purchasers of Grain, and will give the full value for Wheat, Bere, Barley, Oats and Rapeseed.

Wanted, 800 new Hemp Sacks of the best Irish Manufacture; each Sack must weigh 7 lb exactly standing beam.

They have always a large supply of the best KILKENNY COALS, on reasonable Terms.

Dublin Evening Post 12 September 1816

The Mountshannon dog-prison

Let us suppose that you are on a boat, with your dog, and perhaps some humans, and that you decide to visit Mountshannon, Co Clare, in the summer.

Here is a map of Mountshannon. I have stolen it from Clare County Council’s Beach Bye-Laws document, which you can download here [PDF].

Mountshannon, Co Clare

Bye-Law 16 applies to this “beach”:

16) Between the hours of 11am and 6pm during the Summer Season, it shall be prohibited to bring any dog onto any part of the beach except the exempted areas delineated on the schedule of maps attached hereto. Before 11am and after 6pm, a dog may be brought onto the non-exempted areas of the beach on the conditions that:

  • the dog is on a leash;
  • it is not causing annoyance, danger or nuisance to any person using the beach or worrying, chasing, injuring or disturbing any animals, birds or other creatures on the beach; and
  • its faeces is removed and deposited in a suitable receptacle.

There are some exceptions: guide dogs and those employed by the constabulary and the excise-persons.

The area from which dogs are excluded is shown by the hatching on the map. It covers the only exit from the piers to the shore. Thus it is not permissible to take little Fido to the land between 11.00 and 18.00 in the summer.

Little Fido had better be good at crossing his legs.

 

 

 

 

Ennis to Dublin 1838

The public car from Ennis to Williamstown was quite a treat in the way of public travelling; a leather strap, and afterwards a branch of a tree, sufficed for a whip, until an innocent country lad was coaxed into an exchange pro tempore — that is to say, he very good-naturedly lent our driver his whip on a simple promise to return it, and took the branch instead. Although half an hour too late at starting, our loquacious conductor assured us that we would arrive in due time at Williamstown to meet the packet, ‘barring accidents’ — which was well put in, for the wheels were once or twice so hot and the horses so lazy that a stoppage at one time seemed inevitable.

A voyage in a large steamboat of one hundred horse power was quite a novelty to be enjoyed in an inland piece of water, and I greatly enjoyed both this and the voyage up the Shannon, in a less steamboat of twenty four horse power. I had never in my life travelled in a canal passage-boat, and the voyage therein from Shannon Harbour to Dublin was described by a Limerick attorney as a nuisance, horrible beyond endurance. I have never, however, been disposed to rely so much on the opinion of others as on my own experience, and therefore I resolved to try the voyage.

Never was I more agreeably surprised that to find, after sailing in it eighteen hours, I arrived at Dublin too soon, so far as the pleasantness of the journey was concerned. I heard the best Irish songs and recitations, and had a most interesting account of Irish scenery and superstitions from Mr Dennis Leonard, of Kilrush; besides this, I had a very comfortable night’s rest and was altogether much interested and pleased with my first journey on a canal.

From Chapter XV Ireland and the Irish 1838 of Benjamin Ward Richardson Thomas Sopwith MA CE FRS, with excerpts from his diary of fifty-seven years Longmans, Green & Co, London 1891

 

 

The cows of death

On Wednesday, a melancholy accident, attended with the loss of nine lives, occurred on Lough Derg, on the Upper [ie non-tidal] Shannon, by the upsetting of a boat in its passage across the lake from Williamstown to Dromineer. The nine men were jobbers, six of them belonging to Nenagh, and three to Cork, and were returning from a fair in the county Galway.

The accident is said to have been owing to their having carried two cows with them yoked to the boat, one of which, having burst the ties that confined it, became unmanageable, and in a few minutes the boat being upset, all on board were engulphed in the deep.

The Warder and Dublin Weekly Mail 3 March 1849, quoting Limerick Reporter

The Lough Derg Pinnace Club

Lough Derg Pinnace Club

Regatta

To take place off Williamstown Hotel
On MONDAY, the 20th of SEPTEMBER, 1841.
Viscount AVONMORE, Commodore

Sailing Committee: John Burke Esq, Tintrim; Chas Walnutt Esq, Limerick;
W A Minnett Esq, Annabeg

A SILVER Challenge Cup, value 12 Guineas, with the Entrances, to be sailed for by Pinnaces — to start at 12 o’clock. Three to start or no Race. Entrance — Half a Guinea.

A Cot Race, to start at One, pm. Three to start, or no Race.

Three sovereigns added to an Entrance of Five Shillings, to be pulled for in four-oared Gigs. Three to start, or no Race.

A Cot Race, to start at 3 pm. Three to start or no Race.

A Donkey Race, to take place at 4 pm for a Bridle presented by John Burke of Tintrim Esq.

All persons entering Boats for the above Prizes must send their names to the Treasurer previous to the day of Sailing, and the regulated Entrance at the same time.

W H MINNETT, Treasurer

Annabeg, Nenagh, Sept 11

A Dejeune will be prepared at Mr MILLS’ Hotel, Williamstown, at Four o’clock, OM. Tickets, including wine — Gentlemen, 5s; Ladies, 2s 6d to be had of the Committee and the following Gentlemen — Walter Blake Esq, Meelick; Philip Reade Esq, Woodpark; Edmond Burke Esq, Tintrim, and Francis Drew Esq.

September 11

Limerick Chronicle 11 September 1841

Ballinlaw Ferry: much more info

For many people, the first thing to look out for on a Friday morning is Andrew Doherty’s weekly posting on his Waterford Harbour Tides and Tales blog. Today’s subject is the Ballinlaw ferry on the Barrow: I had a bit of information  here (and a question here) but for the full story read Andrew’s account.

Quicksilver

Rev Mr Magawly [MacGauley], a R C Clergyman, is engaged by the Canal Company in the construction of a boat, to be propelled by quick silver, and which is expected to go 20 miles an hour!

Limerick Chronicle 5 September 1838