Tag Archives: porter

R&CHS Longford

The current issue of the Railway & Canal Historical Society‘s Journal contains an article on the sinking of the passage boat Longford on the Royal Canal in 1845 and the fifteen deaths that resulted. The story has also been told here, starting from this page.

REWARD — OUTRAGE

Whereas, on the Evening of Sunday, the 3d inst, several Men entered the Yard of the Royal Canal Company, at the Broadstone, and, with sledges (with which they came prepared), did break Ten Casks of Porter, which had been left there the previous evening, to be forwarded by the Canal.

Now, We, the undersigned, being desirous of bringing to punishment the persons who committed this outrage, and also those parties who, from mercenary motives, are supposed to have instigated them to the act, do hereby offer a Reward of

FIFTY POUNDS

to any person who shall, within Three Months, prosecute to conviction the persons who committed said act, or those who may have instigated them to its commission.

ARTHUR GUINNESS, SONS, & Co
James’s-gate Brewery, Dublin, Sept 8 1837


The Court of Directors of the Royal Canal do hereby offer a further Reward of

FIFTY POUNDS

for the Conviction of the Persons guilty of the foregoing Outrage.

By order, Samuel Draper, Secretary
Royal Canal House, 8th Sept, 1837

Freeman’s Journal 9 September 1837. From the British Newspaper Archive run by Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited, in partnership with the British Library.

The sinking of the Longford 6

Here is the sixth and final page on the sinking of the passage boat Longford on the Royal Canal on 25 November 1845. This page is about who was steering the boat and why the steerer was unable to avoid the accident.

The price of fifteen lives was 1p.

 

Arthur’s Day

I spent today helping the skipper of a barge to carry a cargo of Guinness by water to Limerick, fifty years after the last Grand Canal Company commercial cargo, which was of Guinness to Limerick. (Actually, my help was minimal, confined mostly to acting as ballast, a role I fill very well, and taking 1,439 photographs.) There will be a ceremony at Dolan’s in Limerick tomorrow at the appropriate time.

Folk in other parts of the country may find it easier to undertake a pilgrimage to Uncle Arthur’s final resting place.  Here are links to some maps:

in relation to the Grand Canal. Towards the top right of the page, you can see a little castle symbol, which is roughly where the graveyard is. Notice that the road to the right of the symbol has a sharp bend; the entrance to the graveyard is just north of that bend. It’s a narrow country road, so be careful
– in relation to the N7. The orientation is slightly different on the Google map but you’ll recognise the shape of the area enclosed by the roads
– with the path into the graveyard on the OSI map.

The abandoned line of the Grand Canal to James’s St Harbour

I have put up four pages covering the Main Line of the Irish Grand Canal from Suir Road to the original terminus at Grand Canal Harbour, James’s Street. This account covers Guinness and Dublin’s water supply as well as the line of the canal. There are some photos of trams and of the 1′ 10″ gauge Guinness locomotives for Steam Men. Page 1 of 4 is here.

A stout fellow

Uncle Arthur is resting at Ardclough, near the Grand Canal. His brewery is 250 years old this year, but he himself is sadly neglected — and suffering badly from thirst.

In recognition of his major contribution to the development and use of Irish waterways, a small ceremony was held recently at Ardclough, at which he was presented with a bottle of his finest product. This page records the event.