Tag Archives: Barrow Line

Canal fecundity

Mrs M’Cann, of Castlecomer, gave birth to two infant boys and a girl, in the canal fly boat from Athy to Dublin, on Monday.

Limerick Chronicle 3 March 1838

Just as well they were infants: giving birth to three teenagers would have been difficult.

Fares

We hear that the Committee of the Navigation Board, have settled the rates for passengers from Dublin to Monastereven and the intermediate places, as follows: to Hazel-hatch, eight miles, one shilling and a penny; to Sallins, fourteen miles, two shillings and two pence; to Monastereven, 31 miles, three shillings and nine pence halfpenny; steerage passengers half price.

Saunders’s News-Letter 19 August 1786

From the British Newspaper Archive run by Findmypast Newspaper Archive Limited, in partnership with the British Library.

Saving canals

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Barrow Line 1

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Barrow Line 2

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Barrow Line 3

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Barrow Line 4

When I get a moment, I must find out how many boats have been down that way in this warm, sunny July, the peak of the holiday season. The warmth will have encouraged the vegetation, but I suspect relatively few boats have been through. And only two boats entered the Royal through Dublin in July, even though two openings were offered.

Apart from giving artistic verisimilitude to an otherwise bald and unconvincing narrative about the value of the canal tourist industry and the abiding love of boaters for the canal, using canals helps to keep the weed down.

 

Grand Canal bridge problems [updated]

Read about them here.

That’s not the Irish Grand Canal: it’s the one in Venice, the Monasterevan of the south.

There is a list of Santiago Calatrava’s bridges here, but information about his Irish bridges is lacking. Perhaps someone could send info about the James Joyce bridge and the Samuel Beckett bridge to The Full Calatrava.

Another iconic Calatrava achievement is described here [h/t Don Quijones].

Nothing in this post is intended to be insulting or degrading.

PS here’s a piece about another bridge being built in Foreign Parts, using a floating crane that even Bindon Blood Stoney might have been proud of.

Bell, book and candle …

… shall not drive me back, but something has driven boats from the Bell Harbour in Monasterevan, which I can’t recall seeing so empty: just one cruiser and one WI workboat.

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Cruiser at the Bell Harbour

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WI workboat at the Bell Harbour

Actually, I’m not sure whether it is a WI workboat: I can’t see any logos or other ID on it.

WI canal permits

Latest update here. These are the main points.

Process

Applications for extended mooring permits at nine new locations will be available for two weeks from 19 November to 3 December 2012. The locations are Rathangan and Vicarstown on the Barrow Line (with a third stretch now at Vicarstown), two at Confey and one each at Cloondara and Lock 15 on the Royal and just one, Lock 34 to Griffith Bridge, on the Grand.

The schedule:

Applications for each set of locations are open for two weeks. Completed applications will be processed in order of receipt and mooring locations allocated. If availability exists after the application timeframe for a location has closed, late applications may be considered. Once all the extended mooring locations in an area have been allocated, no more extended mooring permits will be issued for that area in 2013. It is Waterways Ireland’s intention to complete the roll out of the extended mooring permit by March 2013.

That seems to be intended to get boaters to apply ASAP; otherwise they’ll be moored in the middle of nowhere for the rest of 2013.

The application process is set out in detail, with a new item.

From 16 November 2012 permits will no longer be issued by Lockkeepers, or the Eastern Regional Office. Permits will only be issued on completion of an application form submit to and processed by the Tullamore Office.

It is confirmed that applications must be accompanied by “copies of the insurance, and payment for the permit and a damage deposit”.

Downloads

There are four downloads: the application form [DOC] and a supplementary form for consortium members [also DOC], a sample 11-page EMP licence [not permit] agreement [PDF] and a 5-page guidance document [PDF]. A consortium is defined in the guidelines as a group of more than two people who own a single vessel. Owners of unpowered vessels are advised, but not required, to have insurance.

waste

The guidelines have a new item about disposing of rubbish:

Boat owners on the canals will be required to dispose of domestic rubbish at  their own expense. On the application form you need to indicate how you intend to manage this. For example, evidence of a paid collection service or by confirming that you will take your rubbish home and dispose of it through your domestic collection service.

In a limited number of locations Waterways Ireland may offer this service for a charge. Details of this will be notified when the area opens for extended mooring permit applications.

That is as I predicted in the last issue of Afloat.

And there is a paragraph about holding-tanks:

You are asked to tell us if your boat has an operational waste holding tank.  This is not a mandatory requirement, but information is being collected for management purposes.

The licence agreement says that owners have to clean up after dogs.

Here comes the BSC

From 2015 Waterways Ireland will be introducing the requirement for boats needing permits and wishing to use the canals to have a current hull survey to provide evidence that the boat is in good condition.

Not all boats will require this.

Your attention is being drawn to this requirement now to allow you time to prepare for 2015.

That’s from the guidelines document (join the queue now for the dry docks). And these bits are from the licence agreement:

The Licensee undertakes to have regular inspections of the gas and electric services of  his Boat as required to ensure these are kept in a safe and serviceable condition. […]

All Boats must carry adequate fire fighting equipment and have same serviced as per the manufacturer’s recommendations.

Insurance

The application form requires applicants to agree to this:

I/We hereby indemnify and shall keep indemnified Waterways Ireland from and against all actions proceedings costs claims demands and liabilities howsoever arising from my/our use of the facilities provided by Waterways Ireland on the Royal Canal, Grand Canal and Barrow Navigation and shall further indemnify and keep indemnified Waterways Ireland in respect of any accident, injury, loss or damage to any person or property howsoever arising including, without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing, where such accident injury loss or damage arises by reason of any matter or thing done or omitted to be done by me/us or person authorised by me/us or the purported exercise of such use.

I would welcome guidance on whether that might invalidate insurance policies.

Moorings are not transferable

If a Boat is sold it must be removed from the Mooring within seven days and the  Licensee must advise the Licensor’s Inspectorate. The new Boat owner will be required to make an application if they wish to avail of an extended mooring permit and Waterways Ireland will refund the balance pro rata of any fee paid for an extended mooring permit to the Boat owner less a fee of €50 to cover administration costs.

That’s from the draft licence.

Buy shares in Lowtown

Also from the draft licence.

It is not permitted to re-fuel Boats at an extended mooring.

Lots of exciting reading.

WI commercial operating licences

It’s getting hard to keep up with the amount of new regulatory information Waterways Ireland is producing (not that I’m complaining: it’s good that (a) systems exist and (b) information be made public). Today it has put up a page about commercial operating licences with downloadable PDFs for new applicants and for renewals.

WI says that

Waterways Ireland will give consideration to applications for permission to carry on commercial  operations on the waterways which would serve to encourage their use and contribute towards a vibrant waterway environment.

But getting a new licence is not easy. As well as describing the proposed business, you have to have registered the boat with WI and got a Passenger Certificate for from the Marine Surveyor’s office of the Department of Transport (which ain’t easy). If you want to sell alcohol, you have to have a Passenger Vessel
Licence from the Revenue Commissioners.

You have to provide a copy of your insurance policy:

Waterways Ireland requires that vessels carrying passengers hold adequate levels of insurance and appropriately indemnifies [sic] Waterways Ireland […].

And after that you have to show that your business has a chance of surviving:

Waterways Ireland is required to satisfy itself of the financial and economic standing of entities with whom it proposes to contract. In order to make this assessment, please provide relevant information such as recent accounts or Business Plan (including resources, financing, programme for delivery, target market, etc.).

And you have to supply a current Tax Clearance Certificate.

It seems that folk without capital (including working capital) need not apply.

More on WI and the canals

It says here:

A number of questions have been repeatedly posed since the initial communications about the Canal Bye-law Enforcement. These are listed below in the following categories. Click on the category to access the questions and answers.

Five downloadable PDFs on

 

WI EML

EML? Extended Mooring Locations. Lots more info from WI here including a map and list of locations to be EMLed in 2012/13 and PDF maps for each of the locations currently being done.

A big shout out for whoever in WI has taken charge of using the website to keep folk informed: there has been a noticeable, and welcome, increase in the amount of information being made available.

WI extended mooring permits

A Waterways Ireland press release has winged its way to my desk. If you want a permit (or licence?) you must provide a copy of your insurance and pay a damage deposit.

The full thing:

Waterways Ireland announced in June 2012 a change in the permit system allowing for year-long mooring permits on the Grand & Royal Canal and Barrow Navigation. The full list of Extended Mooring Locations has been published and is available on www.waterwaysireland.org, in the Canal Bye-Law Enforcement section.

The first four [for certain values of four. bjg] locations where the permits for extended mooring are being opened for application are Shannon Harbour on the Grand Canal, Rathangan and Vicarstown on the Barrow Line and Barrow Navigation, Clondra (East of Richmond Harbour), Confey and the 15th lock on the Royal Canal.

The application process for the Extended Mooring Permit for these locations will open on the 19th November and will remain open for 2 weeks. Boat owners with boats in the four locations with Combined Mooring and Passage Permits will be advised by letter. The Application Form and Guidance Notes for all applicants will be placed on www.waterwaysireland.org. The applicant is required to complete an application form, supply a copy of their insurance, certify that the boat complies with the byelaws and pay the €152 fee and a damage deposit of €250.

Permits will be allocated on a first come first served basis, so to receive a preferred location early applications are advised. Applications will only be accepted from owners already holding a valid annual Combined Mooring and Passage Permit. Boat owners without a Combined Mooring & Passage Permit who wish to apply for an Extended Mooring Permit can do so by ticking the box on the Extended Mooring Application Form and supplying the additional fee.

Applicants will be notified within 28 days of the success of their application.  Successful applicants will be required to sign the Extended Mooring Permit license and will then have a period in which to move to their new mooring. Enforcement of the 5 day rule will begin in this area following the issue of a Marine Notice.

Applications for the next set of Extended Mooring Locations will continue on a rolling basis thereafter with Waterways Ireland intention to open sufficient locations to cover demand on all of the canals by the end of March 2013.

Boats that cruise and move (staying at a mooring for up to 5 days) will not require an Extended Mooring Permit or be in breach of the Bye-laws.

Waterways Ireland will continue to contact permit holders regularly to ensure they are kept up to date with the roll-out of the new permit. All queries about the enforcement of the current bye-laws or the Extended Mooring Permit should be directed to Shane Anderson, Assistant Inspector of Navigation: Tel no +353 (0)87 286 5726, Email shane.anderson@waterwaysireland.org.

These changes are necessary steps to improve the management of the canals and waterway amenities for both the navigational and recreational user, so that investment in the new infrastructure and facilities which Waterways Ireland has undertaken is maximised for every user.

Despite asking them several times, I still don’t understand what WI means by “permit” and “licence”. And now we have a “Permit licence”.